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Women face an ‘epidemic’ of violence, activists warn

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Women face an ‘epidemic’ of violence, activists warn, as Jess Phillips says it’s ‘a scandal that women don’t feel safe on the streets’

  • Women are facing an ‘epidemic of violence’ that politicians and campaigners have warned about
  • The murder of Sabine Nessa, 28, comes six months after the murder of Sarah Everard, 33
  • Labor spokesman for domestic violence Phillips said it is ‘not safe’ for women
  • At least 78 women have been murdered in the UK since Everard’s murder in March










Women are facing an ‘epidemic’ of violence, politicians and campaigners warned yesterday as they lamented the lack of progress since Sarah Everard’s death.

The murder of Sabina Nessa, 28, in south London comes six months after the murder of Miss Everard and a year after sisters Bibaa Henry and Nicole Smallman were stabbed to death in the capital.

Jess Phillips, the Labor spokesperson for domestic violence and protection, said it was “not safe” to be a woman.

She said 78 women have been murdered in the UK since the death of 33-year-old Miss Everard in March and questioned the government’s response.

“It’s a scandal that women don’t feel safe on the streets,” she said. “It’s not safe to be a woman — whether that’s at work, school, college, or at home. There are too many examples a year.’

Women are facing an ‘epidemic’ of violence, politicians including Labor MP Jess Phillips (pictured) and campaigners warned yesterday as they complained about the lack of progress since Sarah Everard’s death

Referring to Miss Everard, who was kidnapped, raped and murdered by Met police officer Wayne Couzens as he walked home, the MP added: ‘We can’t keep having this. We can’t keep killing someone and then a pilot here and a review there.

“The British public is now demanding good women’s security laws, legislation, resources and strategy to stop this. We can’t just keep regretting it.’

She also demanded that the government reclassify violence against women and girls as a ‘serious crime’, in line with terrorism and serious youth violence.

The murder of Sabina Nessa, 28, in South London comes six months after the murder of Miss Everard and a year after sisters Bibaa Henry and Nicole Smallman were stabbed to death in the capital.

The murder of Sabina Nessa, 28, in South London comes six months after the murder of Miss Everard and a year after sisters Bibaa Henry and Nicole Smallman were stabbed to death in the capital.

Jess Phillips, the Labor spokesman for domestic violence and protection, said 78 women have been murdered in the UK since the death of 33-year-old Miss Everard (pictured) in March and questioned the government's response.

Jess Phillips, the Labor spokesman for domestic violence and protection, said 78 women have been murdered in the UK since the death of 33-year-old Miss Everard (pictured) in March and questioned the government’s response.

The murder of Sabine Nessa comes a year after sisters Bibaa Henry and Nicole Smallman (pictured) were stabbed to death in the capital

The murder of Sabine Nessa comes a year after sisters Bibaa Henry and Nicole Smallman (pictured) were stabbed to death in the capital

Campaigner Anna Birley, who founded the Reclaim These Streets movement, said yesterday: “We are often told when the worst happens that the murder of a woman by a stranger in a public place is very rare and we are very safe.

“But the point is, our experience with street harassment, cat bells, a man exposing himself to us tells us we’re not safe, and murder is rarely the first crime someone commits.”

She said the government urgently needs to restore the “engrained culture of misogyny in British culture” by reforming the criminal justice system.

The campaigner called for a higher conviction rate for rapists, anti-misogynist training for police and classes in schools to ‘tack up toxic masculinity’.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan warned women are facing an ‘epidemic’ of violence. “I think this deserves the same priority as counter-terrorism,” he said.

He added that schools should teach boys to respect girls and misogyny should become a hate crime.

People law flowers at the bandstand on Clapham Common in March in honor of murder victim Sarah Everard

People law flowers at the bandstand on Clapham Common in March in honor of murder victim Sarah Everard

Yesterday, Home Secretary Priti Patel tweeted: “My thoughts are with Sabina Nessa’s family and friends at this terrible time.”

Boris Johnson’s spokesman said: “The prime minister’s focus is on making sure we make our streets safe for absolutely everyone.”

They added that more police were recruited and that the Interior Ministry released a policy strategy in July to tackle violence against women and girls.

When asked if the Metropolitan Police had changed its approach to police brutality against women after Miss Everard’s death, Chief Inspector Trevor Lawry said: ‘I think the main things that are changing are that… we listen to people, we’ We understand where people don’t feel so safe and we do patrols.’

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