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Volvo unveils the world’s first load carrier made of steel without fossil fuels

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Volvo unveils world’s first load carrier made from fossil fuel-free steel in a bid to reduce 68 million tons of CO2 emissions from mining trucks per year

  • The truck has a giant load carrier on the top, which Volvo says is ideal for mining and quarrying
  • The truck is made using iron production using hydrogen instead of steel
  • This process replaces fossil fuels, both in the production of iron pellets and in the carbon purification process










Volvo unveiled the world’s first truck made from fossil-free steel on Wednesday, in a bid to reduce the amount of emissions, water and hazardous waste used to make the building material.

The four-wheel, autonomous vehicle is all-electric, with a giant load carrier on top, making it ideal for quarrying and mining.

The fossil fuel-free steel is formed using hydrogen breakthrough ironmaking technology (HYBRIT), which uses electricity from renewable sources to create the clean-burning gas.

With this process, hydrogen replaces fossil fuels, both in the production of iron pellets and in the carbon purification process.

The environmentally friendly steel used to make Volvos was developed by SSAB, a Swedish company that specializes in making steel from raw materials.

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Volvo unveiled the world’s first truck made from fossil-free steel on Wednesday, in a bid to reduce the amount of emissions, water and hazardous waste used to make the building material.

Martin Lindqvist, President and CEO at SSAB, said in a: pronunciation: ‘It is a real milestone to have the world’s first real vehicle made with SSAB’s fossil-free steel. Our partnership with Volvo Group shows that green transition is possible and delivers results.

“Together we will continue to reduce the climate impact down to the end customer, while ensuring our customers get high quality steel. We look forward to continuing to work with the Volvo Group on research and development to produce more fossil-free steel products.”

The Volvo truck was unveiled by the company’s CEO, Martin Lundstedt, at a press conference in Copenhagen , where he touted it as an ideal machine for picking up and transporting material along a pre-programmed route, Forbes reports.

“This initiative with SSAB sets the benchmark for a fossil-free future,” says Lundstedt.

The fossil-free steel is formed using hydrogen breakthrough ironmaking technology (HYBRIT), which uses electricity from renewable sources to create the clean-burning gas

The fossil-free steel is formed using hydrogen breakthrough ironmaking technology (HYBRIT), which uses electricity from renewable sources to create the clean-burning gas

Just as the nations of the world come together at COP26 to tackle climate change, organizations and industries must work together to develop innovative new solutions for a future without greenhouse gases.

“Volvo Group is committed to pioneering partnerships like this one with SSAB to develop attractive, safe and efficient new vehicles and machines that pave the way for a more sustainable transport and infrastructure system for the future.”

The car is not only autonomous, but also emission-free.

According to researchers at the Rocky Mountain Institute, traditional mining trucks consume approximately 900,000 liters of diesel per year and account for up to 50 percent of a mine’s total energy consumption.

In total, mining trucks emit 68 million tons of CO2 per year, which is equivalent to the total greenhouse gas footprint of Finland or New Zealand.

The environmentally friendly steel used to make Volvos was developed by SSAB, a Swedish company specializing in making steel from raw materials

The environmentally friendly steel used to make Volvos was developed by SSAB, a Swedish company specializing in making steel from raw materials

The disclosure comes after the International Energy Agency called in May to stop investing in new coal mines, oil and gas wells.

The move is a plea to end the use of fossil fuels by 2050 so that there is some chance of limiting global warming to 2.7F or 1.5C.

IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol said the transformation would create millions of new jobs and boost economic growth worldwide.

He said: “The scale and speed of the effort required for this crucial and formidable goal – our best chance of tackling climate change and limiting global warming to 1.5°C – may make this the greatest challenge humanity has ever faced.”

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