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Two workers are fired from the University of Texas after asking students for their vaccination status

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Two employees at Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas, claim they were fired for asking students if they had been vaccinated against the coronavirus.

Bruce Hodge and Karen Corwin were both involved in the Texas Academy of Leadership in the Humanities program – a residential honors program for gifted and talented high school students to earn college credits.

Hodge was the Academy’s Student Services Coordinator, while Corwin was Dean.

They told The Washington Post that they were fired after inquiring about the students’ vaccination status, after not being advised on the university’s COVID-19 protocols.

Hodge and Corwin acted as parents in absentia for most students, making sure they were safe in their dorm rooms every night, caring for them when they were sick, and even taking them to the emergency room or the emergency room if needed.

“I could foresee a situation with a disabled student where I couldn’t reach a parent and a doctor asks me if they’ve been vaccinated,” Hodge told the Post.

Karen Corwin has been the advisor to the Texas Academy of Leadership in the Humanities since 2005

Bruce Hodge and Karen Corwin, two Lamar University employees, were fired after asking students for their vaccination status

Hodge said he wasn’t aware of the university’s COVID-19 protocol, so he and Corwin decided to create blue vaccine coupons to find out who had been vaccinated against the virus.

“We’re just collecting a large amount of medical information about these students that normal students don’t have to provide,” Hodge told the Post.

With few exceptions, most of the 30 students said they had been double stabbed.

“Not a single student was shocked when we gave it to them,” he said of the blue slips.

Reassured by the outcome, the two school staff members showed the dean, but claimed he seemed “excited” that they had come up with the briefs.

Hodge also explained to the dean that he and Corwin wanted to be prepared for a worst-case scenario.

The vaccination slips were eventually passed on to the associate provost and the school’s police chief before Hodge and Corwin got involved in meetings with school administrators.

They were also summoned to the university’s personnel office before being fired on September 13.

‘There was no discussion. There was nothing,” Corwin said.

Texas is an employment state where employers can generally fire employees for any reason.

Although they were not officially given an explanation for their dismissal, Hodge and Corwin believed they had been fired because of the politicization regarding the COVID-19 vaccine in Texas.

Governor Greg Abbott announced an executive order in August banning the government from COVID-19 vaccine mandates in Texas, regardless of a vaccine's approval status with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Governor Greg Abbott announced an executive order in August banning the government from COVID-19 vaccine mandates in Texas, regardless of a vaccine’s approval status with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Governor Greg Abbott issued an executive order in May that prohibits state agencies in Texas — including counties, cities, school districts, public health agencies or government officials — from wearing or requiring masks.

Public schools could continue to follow current mask-wearing guidelines until June 4. After June 4, no student, teacher, parent or other staff member or visitor may be required to wear a mask on campus.

Governor Abbott also banned government mandates for COVID-19 vaccines in August, regardless of whether they have full FDA approval.

“I don’t think you need to be a super detective,” Corwin said, referring to the untold reason for her firing.

Gifted high school students enrolled at the Texas Academy of Leadership in the Humanities must stay in their rooms and attend classes at Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas

Gifted high school students enrolled at the Texas Academy of Leadership in the Humanities must stay in their rooms and attend classes at Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas

Corwin and Hodge consulted legal experts for advice, but were told it would be difficult to win a case against the university for unfair dismissal due to local labor laws.

“What they did was shameful and wrong,” Corwin said.

“We thought we were protecting the students,” Hodge said. “I lay awake at night realizing the liability resting on me and the shoulder of the academy with these 16- and 17-year-olds on campus.”

“I’m still worried,” Hodge added. “I just hope everything is okay, that nothing happens to a student.”

Lamar University told Dailymail.com that they declined to comment on such matters.

More than 9,000 Texans who died from COVID-19 in August and September, nearly 40 percent of them under the age of 60, are part of a worrying rise in the reported daily number of deaths that outweighed the lethal rise in the average weekly number from last week. summer threatens to catch up.

Just over 50 percent of the Texas population is fully vaccinated. Health officials say the high percentage of unvaccinated people in the state contributed to an increase in COVID-19-related hospitalizations, which predated the spike in deaths that quickly followed.

On October 4, 64,785 people of the more than 704,000 people in the US who died from the virus came from the Lone Star state

On October 4, 64,785 people of the more than 704,000 people in the US who died from the virus came from the Lone Star state

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