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ScoMo’s shady nephew narrowly avoids jail for defrauding customers to fund his ‘cocaine habit’

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Scott Morrison’s nephew narrowly avoided jail after pleading guilty to defrauding clients with dodgy construction work, with a court hearing in which he used the money to fund his cocaine addiction.

Mitchell James Cole, 29, pleaded guilty in July to 20 charges, including doing residential work without a permit and claiming to receive payment for building without insurance.

The prime minister’s nephew was sentenced on Tuesday to two years in prison and a $26,000 fine at the local Parramatta court, with the magistrate saying he was lucky to avoid jail.

“You have a history and your conduct to date shows that you have little respect for those who have bought your services,” Magistrate Kasey Pearce said.

“You were about to go to jail.”

Uncle ScoMo: Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his cousin-in-law Mitchell James Cole at a Christmas party at Kirribilli House in 2018

Pictured: What remains of the unfinished construction work at one of Mr Cole's victim's homes.  He was sentenced on Tuesday to two years in prison by the local court of Parramatta

Pictured: What remains of the unfinished construction work at one of Mr Cole’s victim’s homes. He was sentenced on Tuesday to two years in prison by the local court of Parramatta

The 29-year-old used family snaps from Christmas lunch at Kirribilli House to gain the trust of innocent families before letting them out of their own pockets with thousands of dollars for his dodgy construction work.

NSW Fair Trading filed suit against the prime minister’s unnamed relative with a list of aggrieved parties who came forward to testify.

Each of Mr. Cole’s clients lost between $4,000 and $20,000 due to his mediocre work, and several spoke to A Current Affair about their experiences with him.

Magistrate Pearce said further offenses by Scott Morrison’s nephew could result in him serving “a period of full-time detention” with “going nowhere” for the dodgy tradition.

Cole told the court that he was “going through a really bad time with drug and alcohol addiction” and that he was “very sorry and sorry, and I honestly didn’t mean to take people’s money and not do the job and be flawed.” to do work’.

The magistrate said she was trying to find the “nexus” between his illegality and drug use, saying it was “hard to accept” that he was not “accepting people’s money” to fuel his coke addiction.

Lawyers for Mr Morrison’s cousin argued that his case was the subject of an A Current Affair episode counting for “extracurricular punishment,” but the magistrate rejected the idea.

She said the story focused on “Mr Cole’s conduct as a builder, and an unlicensed and uninsured builder” and “not making the allegations against him overly sensational.”

Magistrate Pearce said further offenses by Scott Morrison's nephew could result in him undergoing

Magistrate Pearce said further offenses by Scott Morrison’s nephew could result in him undergoing “a period of full-time detention” with “going nowhere” for the dodgy tradition

“You have a history and your conduct to date shows that you have little respect for those who have bought your services,” Magistrate Kasey Pearce said.

Scott Morrison's cousin (pictured) pleaded guilty to 17 counts of performing 'unlicensed' and 'uninsured' work in 2019 and was sentenced to two years in prison

Scott Morrison’s cousin (pictured) pleaded guilty to 17 counts of performing ‘unlicensed’ and ‘uninsured’ work in 2019 and was sentenced to two years in prison

One of his victims, James McCall, handed Mr Cole $33,000 for some construction work on his backyard and pool.

Mr Cole left the house unfinished and tattered with no gate for the property’s fencing and pool tiles that were not properly stuck, which later came loose, Mr McCall claims.

“He would message me and say, ‘I’ll be there tomorrow,’ and he would never show up,” Mr. McCall told A Current Affair.

The hardworking Aussie said the prime minister’s cousin spoke quickly of his famous uncle when they met.

“We were just talking and he told me he was related to Scott Morrison. He uses that to make himself look legit and he seemed real,” Mr McCall said.

“Don’t trust him at all.”

Cole is seen in 2019 confronted on the street by an A Current Affair reporter at an insincere moment for a relative of the country’s leader.

Fay Voyiatsis said it was the same story when Cole offered to fix up her backyard, which is still in disarray.

“He told us Scott Morrison was his uncle and he showed us pictures of him and his extended family, including his uncle celebrating Christmas together,” Ms Voyiatsis told the programme, fighting back tears.

She paid Cole $56,000 for the unfinished home renovations, saying “he took our dreams and turned them into a nightmare.”

“I don’t think he ever intended to finish this job, he was just trying to get as much money out of us as possible and walk away.

“It’s terrible to think you’re being fooled like that just because you trust.”

Yet another victim, Peter Flanagan, launched a civil suit against Cole and $28,000 in a tribunal that found Cole responsible for the damage to their property.

But despite the verdict, Mr Flanagan has not seen a cent.

“It was a mess. We didn’t actually have a front door to access our house, so I tried every legal avenue to get the money back,” he said.

“He’s a slime ball.”

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