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Sanders says Biden’s billion-dollar spending plan is being held up by ‘our corrupt’ political system

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Bernie Sanders says Biden’s billion-dollar spending plan is being held back by ‘our corrupt, money-dominated political system’ and pharmaceutical giants who don’t want Medicare to negotiate drug prices

  • The Vermont senator also blamed the fossil fuel industry and health insurers
  • He praised provisions to add vision, dental and hearing coverage to Medicare
  • He criticized industry lobbying in an op-ed on the Fox News website
  • He pointed to the 50-50 Senate and the closely divided House
  • “Will all Democrats unite to protect the interests of the elderly, children, the sick and the poor?”
  • Coming as Senate Centrists Force Back the Plan










Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is going after the pharmaceutical industry and corporate giants for slowing down the path of President Joe Biden’s multi-trillion budget plans.

With a $3.5 trillion infrastructure bill and a $3.5 trillion reconciliation bill tangling as leaders try to win over two tenacious Democratic centrists, Sanders turned his sights outside the Capitol, with an op-ed on the Fox News website Wednesday.

He began touting public polls showing support for individual parts of the bill — though other surveys have shown that most Americans still don’t know what’s in it.

“So, given this overwhelming support, why is this bill taking so long to pass? The answer is simple. Follow the money,” wrote Sanders, who has also railed against major pharmaceutical companies and the fossil fuel industry during his presidential campaigns.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders blames opposition pharmaceuticals, healthcare and fossil fuel industries for holding up President Biden’s $3.5 trillion atonement bill

“As part of our corrupt, money-driven political system, the pharmaceutical industry is now spending hundreds of millions of dollars on lobbying, campaign contributions and television ads to defeat this legislation because it doesn’t want Medicare to negotiate lower prices for prescription drugs. . To increase their profits, they want US taxpayers to continue to pay by far the highest prices in the world for our medicine — sometimes ten times more than people in other countries,” he writes.

He also went after health insurers that he said were “strongly opposed” to the legislation.

Sanders' Opinion Comes As President Joe Biden Continues To Negotiate With Lawmakers Over A Slimmed Package Amid Opposition From Two Senate Democrats

Sanders’ Opinion Comes As President Joe Biden Continues To Negotiate With Lawmakers Over A Slimmed Package Amid Opposition From Two Senate Democrats

Senator Kyrsten Sinema, a Democrat from Arizona, has been in talks with the White House for weeks

Senator Kyrsten Sinema, a Democrat from Arizona, has been in talks with the White House for weeks

Sanders denounces pharmaceutical companies for lobbying against package

Sanders denounces pharmaceutical companies for lobbying against package

Sanders' pitch came as House Progressives indicated a willingness to reduce the total cost of the bill

Sanders’ pitch came as House Progressives indicated a willingness to reduce the total cost of the bill

“The fossil fuel industry is launching a major ad campaign to beat this legislation because it seems more concerned about protecting their short-term profits than about tackling the existential threat of climate change,” he writes.

Sanders is trying to draw attention to the different parts of the bill, even as party leaders look for ways to scale it back.

He cites expanding Medicare to provide dental and hearing coverage, climate change provisions, the power to negotiate lower prices for prescription drugs, and a requirement “that the rich and big corporations pay their fair share of taxes,” together. with an extended child tax of $300 per month credit.

What Sanders doesn’t do is point the finger at Senate members, including Democratic Senate Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona and Joe Manchin of West Virginia, though he does call for party unity. Under the budget rules, Democrats can drag the package through both chambers with a simple majority.

“So, in a tied Senate with 50 members from each of the Democratic and Republican primaries and a House of Representatives that has only a three-vote majority for Democrats, the question is whether we can finally enact consistent legislation to protect the lives of workers. to improve.” class families equates to democratic unity,” writes Sanders, who originally backed a larger $6 trillion bill.

‘Will Democrats’ all standing together to protect the interests of the elderly, children, the sick and the poor? Shall all Democrats stand together to face the greed of the pharmaceutical industry, health insurers, the fossil fuel industry and wealthy campaign workers?” he asks.

“I sure hope so,” he concludes.

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