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Queensland Covid-19: Australia’s regions will not reach 80% vaccination coverage until 2022

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REVEALED: Aussie regions won’t hit 80% vaccination rate until 2022 – as Queensland and WA refuse to open borders

  • Queensland premier has hinted she may close her borders to 80 percent
  • Said she wanted a more even spread of Covid vaccination rates across the state?
  • Brisbane and Noosa are predicted to reach 80 percent in the next six weeks
  • But in Rockhampton, only 64.8 percent will get a double dose by November 22
  • Likely early 2022 before the city hits the 80 percent double dose










Regional parts of Queensland may not reach the double vaccination rate of 80 percent Covid until 2022 – fueling fears it could be months before the state opens up to the rest of Australia.

Prime Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk said last week she wanted a more “even spread” of Covid-19 vaccination rates across the state before considering allowing interstate travel again.

Her stance is similar to that of Western Australia Prime Minister Mark McGowan, who wants to shut out the rest of the country until a double dose of 90 percent is reached.

Brisbane, Noosa and Goodiwindi in the southeast of the state are expected to reach the 80 percent mark in the next six weeks.

But in Rockhampton in central Queensland, just 64.8 percent of the eligible population is expected to be fully vaccinated by Nov. 22, according to a data analysis from The Courier-Mail.

Pictured: A Gladstone neighborhood in central Queensland. The city may not achieve an 80 percent vaccination rate with a double dose until early 2022

Pictured: A pedestrian wearing a mask in Brisbane on September 28.  Brisbane, Noosa and Goodiwindi are expected to reach 80 percent within the next six weeks

Pictured: A pedestrian wearing a mask in Brisbane on September 28. Brisbane, Noosa and Goodiwindi are expected to reach 80 percent within the next six weeks

In nearby Gladstone, this figure is predicted to be just 61.7 percent, while in the Lockyer Valley west of Brisbane, only 62.7 percent will be fully vaccinated by that date.

In those regions, the 80 percent fully vaccinated limit may not be reached until early 2022.

Queensland as a whole is expected to reach 80 percent by the end of November.

Modeling shows it could take until 2024 for Aboriginal communities like Cherbourg, 250km north of Brisbane, to reach that milestone.

The double dose in that city is currently only 19.4 percent.

Ms Palaszczuk has repeatedly refused to set a date for reopening Queensland’s borders.

Health Secretary Yvette D’Ath said the state’s “goal” was to avoid the 60,000 cases recorded in NSW during the latest Delta outbreak.

“If anyone wants a target, the target is to protect yourself in the next five to six weeks,” said Ms. D’Ath.

THE PARTS OF QUEENSLAND WITH LOW COVID VACCINATION PRICES

More than 15 double dose vaccinations from October 10:

Lockyer Valley – 43.7 percent

Western Downs – 43.4 percent

Logan – 42.4 percent

Banana – 41.7 percent

Charters Towers – 37.6 percent

Central Highlands – 37.1 percent

Isaac – 25.3 percent

Cherbourg – 19.4 percent

Yarrabah – 19 percent

Queensland’s double dose is only slightly higher than WA, the country’s least vaccinated state, which is considering mandatory shots in more sectors.

That could include the wider public sector workforce, including school teachers.

Australian Industry Group chief executive Innes Willox said Queensland should open before WA due to its connection to other eastern states.

“They can’t stay behind their limits forever,” he told ABC.

“It’s not feasible, it’s not possible, it’s not real to do that.”

Only 62.7 percent will be fully vaccinated by November 22 in the Lockyer Valley west of Brisbane

Only 62.7 percent will be fully vaccinated by November 22 in the Lockyer Valley west of Brisbane

Mr Willox said he understood the unwillingness of Covid-free states to reopen borders.

“WA will do things on their own time. They are vital to the national economy, but less connected because of their reliance on iron ore and other natural resources,” he said.

“They can afford to stay a little longer if necessary, but both are really starting to feel the bottleneck with the labor shortage and that alienation from the rest of the country.”

Queensland Prime Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk said last week she wanted a more 'even spread' of Covid-19 vaccination rates across the state before considering allowing interstate travel again

Queensland Prime Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk said last week she wanted a more ‘even spread’ of Covid-19 vaccination rates across the state before considering allowing interstate travel again

ACTU Secretary Sally McManus urged every employer to have a plan to address the risks to employees and customers as Australia moves closer to normal life.

“It’s just going to be crucial,” she said.

“Otherwise there’s more transmission and it’s all about hospitalizations and deaths.”

Unions want more ventilation, social distancing and testing regimes, along with guarantees that retail and hospitality workers are protected when checking customers’ vaccination status.

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