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Private school in Miami charging $30ka year reverses rule requiring students to quarantine for 30 days

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A Miami school that planned to implement a quarantine policy that would force students to take a month off after receiving a dose of COVID-19 vaccine has now given up on the idea.

School officials at the $30,000-a-year private school, Centner Academy, feared that students who received the vaccine would infect unvaccinated students.

The school’s Chief Operating Officer, Bianca Erickson, wrote to parents about the bizarre policy: ‘Due to the potential impact on other students and our school community, vaccinated students will be required to stay home for 30 days after vaccination for each dose and booster. they receive.’

But the school, which is threatened with a cut in state funding of between $6,500 and $7,400 per student if they go through with the policy, has now scrapped the plan.

Miami’s Centner Academy, pictured, has told COVID-19 vaccinated teachers to stay away from students because they can ‘pass something’ to them

Leila and David Centner, pictured, co-founded the school.  The pair wrote to staff earlier in the year that vaccinated workers would no longer be allowed to work directly with students

Leila and David Centner, pictured, co-founded the school. The pair wrote to staff earlier in the year that vaccinated workers would no longer be allowed to work directly with students

Florida’s Department of Education wrote to the school to clarify their position.

“Recently it has come to our attention that your schools have an attendance policy that requires parents of recently vaccinated students to quarantine their children for an unreasonable, unnecessary and unnecessarily onerous amount of time before returning for personal instruction,” says the Florida Department of Education’s letter to Centerer Academy said.

“Should our investigation reveal that your school’s policies do not comply with these legal rights and obligations, please understand that the action that follows – up to and including the withdrawal of your school’s eligibility and funding – will be both prompt and decisive .’

CEO Erickson hastily wrote a response back to the Florida Department of Education on Friday, explaining the schools’ sudden decline.

“When we announced the topic policy regarding COVID-19, we felt we were acting in accordance with the Ministry of Education emergency rule… which allows a student to be considered as attending school when under a ‘stay at home’ policy.” directive falls due to COVID-19,” the letter began.

“Our plan at the time included a ‘stay at home’ policy that would be supported by distance learning.

“However, please note that the plan has not been implemented and we will not pursue such measures. We conclude our response by confirming that Centner Academy is not asking any student to quarantine at home due to vaccination status.”

The private school, which has rejected federal guidelines on mask use and vaccinations in the past, last year received a loan of more than $800,000 in government money — from the taxpayer-funded, federal Paycheck Protection Program.

dr. Aileen Marty, an infectious disease expert at Florida International University, said the school’s policies were unfounded.

“What happens 30 days after they are vaccinated?” she asked. “What nonsense is this?”

dr.  Aileen Marty, an infectious disease expert at Florida International University, denounced the school's policy in an interview with 7News, saying there is no basis for it.

dr. Aileen Marty, an infectious disease expert at Florida International University, denounced the school’s policy in an interview with 7News, saying there is no basis for it.

“Where did they get that from?” she asked 7News again, rhetorically. “There’s nothing in the recommendations about that… they made that up.

“That’s science fiction,” Marty said, “not even science fiction, because it’s pure fiction.”

“I don’t find the letter interesting, I find it sad,” she continued. “I think it’s terrible that all this misleading information comes from an institution that is supposedly an educational institution.

‘The technology is not new. The technology is well established and based on the best science we have.’

The Centers for Disease Control says all three of the Food and Drug Administration-approved COVID-19 vaccinations are safe because they do not use live viruses and therefore cannot make anyone sick with COVID.

Children aged 12 and older are currently eligible for a COVID vaccine, and children aged 5 to 11 are also likely to be approved in the coming weeks.

Vaccinating children has proven to be a controversial topic. Many parents who are pro-vax themselves say they aren’t sure their kids will get it, because COVID is relatively harmless to the vast majority of kids who get it.

Those who support childhood vaccines say that even a small risk is unethical to take when it comes to a child’s health.

The Miami-based school, which teaches students from kindergarten through senior year of high school, previously faced controversy in April when co-founders Leila and David Centner wrote to staff that vaccinated workers would no longer interact directly with students. should work.

Teachers at the school were told they could either physically distance themselves from students if given the chance; tell the school if they plan to get the vaccine ‘because we can’t let newly vaccinated people near our students until more information is known’; or wait until the school year ends to get the vaccine.

As of Sunday, about 67 percent of eligible Americans have received at least one dose of the COVID vaccine and 58 percent are fully vaccinated.

Meanwhile, the number of COVID cases has continued to fall, with 17,100 new cases reported on Sunday — about 90 percent less than a post-vaccine high of 184,000 on Sept. 3.

And the number of deaths from COVID has also fallen, with just 148 reported on Sunday, compared to 3,155 on Sept. 23.

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