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Phone scammer hastily hangs up after being told ‘you called New Zealand POLICE’

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A scammer hastily hung up after accidentally calling New Zealand police and attempting to make a hoax call on the internet.

Police this week shared an audio recording of the scam attempt on Instagram, in which ‘Greg from Spark’ accidentally calls Dan from the New Zealand Police Communications Centre.

The recording begins with Greg and Dan sharing pleasantries before the scammer says he’s calling about Dan’s internet connection.

The cheeky con man says, “I’m calling about your internet connection, okay?”

New Zealand Police have shared an audio recording of an attempted scam in which ‘Greg from Spark’ accidentally calls Dan from the New Zealand Police Communication Center (file image)

The recording begins with Greg and Dan sharing pleasantries, before the scammer says he's calling about Dan's internet connection, claiming the police officer did an

The recording begins with Greg and Dan sharing pleasantries, before the scammer says he’s calling about Dan’s internet connection, claiming the police officer did an “online survey.”

After Dan answers “OK,” Greg continues, “So you did an online survey, and according to our survey, you need to know that your internet isn’t on a secure line, okay?”

To which the police officer replies bluntly, “Well, you called the New Zealand police, so I’d be surprised if our internet wasn’t secure.”

Greg is clearly startled by the scammer and pauses before asking, “Is it the police?”

The officer replies, “This is the New Zealand Police Communications Center, yes.”

Greg then quickly apologizes for “harassing” the police officer and very quickly hangs up the phone.

New Zealand police shared the three-year-old hoax call on Instagram in an effort to encourage people to report it if they’ve been victims of phone scams.

The scammer tells Dan that his internet isn't 'on a secure line', to which the officer replies, 'You called the New Zealand police, so I'd be surprised if our internet wasn't secure'

The scammer tells Dan that his internet isn’t ‘on a secure line’, to which the officer replies, ‘You called the New Zealand police, so I’d be surprised if our internet wasn’t secure’

Police shared the three-year-old hoax call to urge people to report hoax calls.  The estimated Zeelanders lose between $20 million and $30 million annually in scams (file image)

Police shared the three-year-old hoax call to urge people to report hoax calls. The estimated Zeelanders lose between $20 million and $30 million annually in scams (file image)

The NZ Police’s Financial Intelligence Unit estimates that New Zealanders lose between $20 million and $30 million annually through scams.

Police issued advice on what to do if you receive a scam call: ‘Do not give them access to your computer or give them any personal or financial information.

“Many people who have been scammed are too proud to file a complaint because they may feel ashamed or stupid that they got sucked in.

“Due to people’s pride, a significant number of these scams are grossly underreported, so there’s no real way to know.”

People took to social media to praise New Zealand police officer Dan for his excellent response to the hoax call.

One person wrote: ‘This was epic.’

Another said, “Well done Dan.”

A third share their own experience, warning: ‘I remember that the so-called bnz bank called me to ask for my card details. Like I wanted to hand that over over the phone.

“Don’t get carried away with people, these scammers can also be super persistent.”

And a fourth joked: ‘Let’s all say we’re the NZ police and that will put them off.’

While a fifth wrote: ‘It’s crammed and then there’s this.’

Surprisingly, it’s not the first time a brazen fraudster has made a mistake and accidentally called the New Zealand police.

A foreign con man accidentally targeted the Corps and abused the responding officer when called.

In November 2020, New Zealand police shared a hilarious recording of the three-year-old phone call on social media.

The scammer appeared to be trying to access his victim’s computers and asked the agent to navigate to a specific website.

The scammer told the agent to “turn on the computer so I can help you” and asked him to “open your internet explorer, sir.”

“This is a support server connection from the Windows technical department, sir. So that we can help you fix the problems with your computer.”

The agent continued to joke with the fraudster before swindling him.

“Is this a scam, is this a fake call?” he asked.

“If it was a scam or a hacking call, we wouldn’t have called you, we would have gotten instant access to your computer, hacked into your computer and did everything to your computer,” the scammer replied.

‘I think this is a scammer, isn’t he from abroad?’

The scammer assured the officer it wasn’t a scam before getting aggressive when the officer revealed he was from New Zealand Police.

The officer asked, “So you’re trying to scam the New Zealand police?”

“Shut up, fuck off,” the con man said and hung up.

NEW ZEALAND POLICE TIPS TO AVOID SCAMS

* A real bank or organization will never contact you to ask for your PIN or password or to transfer money to another account.

* Never click on a link in an unexpected email or text message – you could be giving access to your personal and financial information.

* Always question uninvited approaches in case it is a scam. Instead, contact the company directly at a known email address or phone number.

* Don’t assume an email or phone call is authentic – just because someone knows your basic information (name and address or your mother’s maiden name) doesn’t mean they’re real.

* Don’t be rushed to make a decision or financial transaction on the spot – a real bank or trusted organization would never do this.

* Listen to your instincts – if something doesn’t feel right, it generally doesn’t.

Source: New Zealand Police

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