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NYC Mayor Hopeful Eric Adams Says He’ll LOVE the City’s Gifted and Talented Schools Program

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New York’s Democratic mayoral candidate Eric Adams pledged to keep the city’s gifted and talented schools program.

Adams said de Blasio does not have the power to end the program, and that it is up to the next mayor to decide the fate, adding that he wanted to keep and even expand the program, which was said to discriminate against black people. and Spanish students.

“The gifted and talented program was only for certain communities,” Adams said in an interview with… CNN. ‘That caused segregation in our classrooms.’

“We need to expand.”

NYC mayor hopeful Eric Adams pledged to keep the city’s gifted and talented program despite current mayor Bill de Blasio’s plan to end it

De Blasio announced he wanted to end the gifted and talented program before leaving office next month and replacing it with the 'Brilliant NYC' plan

De Blasio announced he wanted to end the gifted and talented program before leaving office next month and replacing it with the ‘Brilliant NYC’ plan

De Blasio and critics of the current program said it was mostly filled with white and Asian-American students. About 43 percent of the students are Asian, 36 percent are white, 8 percent are Hispanic, and 6 percent are black.

It is skewed relative to the city’s child population, which is about 35 percent Hispanic, 26 percent white, 21 percent black and 12 percent Asian.

Opponents also opposed the first exam that listed children as “gifted” as early as four years old.

“The era of judging four-year-olds based on a single test is over,” de Blasio said last week.

Previously, the program accepted 2,600 gifted preschoolers, but now about 65,000 children will be considered under De Blasio’s replacement plan, which he calls Brilliant NYC.

“Brilliant NYC will provide accelerated instruction to tens of thousands of children, as opposed to a select few,” he said.

Protesters took to City Hall and the NYC Department of Education headquarters on Thursday to demand that the gifted and talented program continue.

Protesters took to City Hall and the NYC Department of Education headquarters on Thursday to demand that the gifted and talented program continue.

More than 200 protesters came out to say removing the current program would harm students

More than 200 protesters came out to say removing the current program would harm students

Opponents argued that gifted students would be delayed and students who needed more attention would be left behind under de Blasio's plans

Opponents argued that gifted students would be delayed and students who needed more attention would be left behind under de Blasio’s plans

Protesters also rejected the idea that the program discriminated against certain students

Protesters also rejected the idea that the program discriminated against certain students

But parents and teachers say ending the program in its current state will pose more problems for students: The gifted kids will be bored and slow down in mixed-skill classrooms, and those who need more attention will be “left behind.” become, they say.

More than 200 supporters of the program, including city officials, protested Thursday against the proposed cancellation in front of the city’s Ministry of Education headquarters and city hall. New York Post reports.

Clayton Broome, whose two children are currently on the program, claimed the program was not for the privileged.

“My only two children got admission to one of the most prestigious of these schools, and we are far from privileged,” he said.

The protesters were also quick to note that de Blasio’s own children attended the gifted and talented program.

The National Association for Gifted Children also criticized de Blasio’s plan to get rid of the program, but supported the mayor in scrapping the standardized test for four-year-olds.

In a statement, the association said it “supports the mayor’s plan to eliminate the one-size-fits-all standardized test to identify gifted students because it often fails to recognize a significant number of black, brown and impoverished gifted students.” ‘

Protesters also pointed out that Bill de Blasio's children attended the program

Protesters also pointed out that Bill de Blasio’s children attended the program

Critics say the program cannot be removed without an adequate replacement plan

Critics say the program cannot be removed without an adequate replacement plan

Eric Adams said he would not only maintain the city's gifted and talented program, but would also make other changes to meet the needs of students with learning disabilities.

Eric Adams said he would not only maintain the city’s gifted and talented program, but would also make other changes to meet the needs of students with learning disabilities.

Adams’ assistants said the hopeful mayors had plans to postpone or change the test next year, as well as seeking broader changes to the city’s education programs. New York Times reports.

If elected, Adams said he would not only make changes to the program for gifted and talented people, but also drive broader changes to the education system by removing barriers for students with dyslexia and other learning disabilities.

He added that the schools should test students during their years in public schools to ensure their needs were met.

Adams’ opponent in the mayoral race, Republican Curtis Silwa, also said he supported the gifted and talented program.

The Guardian Angels founder called de Blasio a “lame duck” last week and added that he would also expand admission to the program.

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