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Nigella Lawson only went on a plant-based diet for TWO WEEKS after she became ‘very exhausted’

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“I couldn’t be a vegan… I don’t see the point!” Nigella Lawson admits she went on a plant-based diet for TWO WEEKS after it left her ‘very exhausted’ and exacerbated iron deficiency










Nigella Lawson has revealed she only went on a plant-based diet for two weeks after feeling “very exhausted” and an iron deficiency worsening.

Speak with The Sunday Times about her new book Cook, Eat, Repeat, the TV chef admitted, “I couldn’t be vegan, although I love vegetables. I don’t see the point.’

The food writer, who is famous for her playful innuendo, continued: ‘I’m very glad I don’t eat so much meat, but I do love it. I’m also in a privileged position and get delicious cured beef or lamb, so I never like to lecture people.’

“I don’t see the point!” Nigella Lawson has revealed she went on a plant-based diet for just two weeks after feeling ‘very exhausted’ and an iron deficiency worsening

“I felt very exhausted, and I have a low iron level anyway. So I needed it,” she revealed.

Referring to factory-produced plant-based food alternatives, the media personality said: ‘I want to eat good food because I think we have the teeth for meat and so it’s natural for us to want to eat it.

“I know it’s an argument vegans don’t agree with, so I respect that position, but I feel I’m not ready yet.”

New title: Speaking to The Sunday Times about her new book Cook, Eat, Repeat, the TV chef admitted,

New title: Speaking to The Sunday Times about her new book Cook, Eat, Repeat, the TV chef admitted, “I couldn’t be vegan, although I love vegetables. I don’t see the point’

Her controversial take on vegan diets comes as Nigella recently avoided another controversy.

The London-based star has the word ‘s**t’ from her recipes after she said it had taken on a ‘rougher’ and ‘crueltier’ meaning in recent years.

In April, Nigella posted her recipe of the day — Ruby Red Raspberries in Chardonnay Jelly — on her Twitter account, with dozens of fans saying it was one of their favorites.

Avoiding controversy: It's because the London-based star recently ditched the word 's**t' from her recipes after saying it had taken on a 'rougher' and 'crueltier' meaning in recent years

Avoiding controversy: It’s because the London-based star recently ditched the word ‘s**t’ from her recipes after saying it had taken on a ‘rougher’ and ‘crueltier’ meaning in recent years

But the eagle-eyed among them noticed that when the recipe first appeared in one of her books — 2002’s Forever Summer — it was called S**t Red Raspberries in Chardonnay Jelly.

One fan wondered why she dropped the term, saying, “Beautiful recipe (as always!) But I wonder what happened to this country if we can’t even call that recipe by its hilarious original name. What happened to our freedom of expression, humor and fun? I love your twist Nigella!

Nigella replied, “I feel like the word has taken on a coarser, more cruel connotation, and I’m not happy about that.”

'I'm not happy about that': But the eagle-eyed among them noticed that when the recipe first appeared in one of her books, it was called S**t Red Raspberries in Chardonnay Jelly

‘I’m not happy about that’: But the eagle-eyed among them noticed that when the recipe first appeared in one of her books, it was called S**t Red Raspberries in Chardonnay Jelly

Nigella has often been hailed as a feminist for trying to break the age-old notion that women should be the makers of food, but not its consumers.

She was also praised for refusing to conform to the celebrity trend of being thin — recently telling American TV and billboards not to airbrush her stomach in ads.

She has also said that enjoying cooking is not anti-feminist, saying her title “Household Goddess” reflected that.

Good role model: Nigella has often been hailed as a feminist for trying to break the age-old notion that women should be the makers of food, but not its consumers

Good role model: Nigella has often been hailed as a feminist for trying to break the age-old notion that women should be the makers of food, but not its consumers

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