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More than half of young adults between the ages of 18 and 29 believe American democracy is in trouble or failing: Poll

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A new poll shows that a majority of young Americans have lost faith in democracy.

The Harvard survey found that 52 percent of young Americans between the ages of 18 and 29 believe that American democracy is “in trouble,” if not just “failing,” at 39 percent and 14%, respectively.

Meanwhile, 27 percent thought the government was “somewhat functioning” and only 7 percent saw America as a “sound democracy.” Thirteen percent said they “didn’t know.”

The numbers come from the Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics (IOP), which surveyed 2,109 Americans ages 18 to 29.

The survey found that young Democrats were also divided on the topic, with 44 percent believing that democracy is currently healthy or somewhat functioning, while 45 percent believe it is in trouble or failing.

Seventy percent of young Republicans were much more pessimistic about the state of the nation, 47 believed democracy was in trouble and 23 percent believed it had failed.

The survey found that a majority of independent and unaffiliated young Americans, 51 percent, also said we are in trouble or have failed.

The young American’s lack of faith extended to President Joe Biden, with just 46 percent saying they approve of the president, compared to 59 percent last year.

Young Americans’ lack of faith extended to President Joe Biden — just 46 percent said they approved of the president, compared to 59 percent last year

A poll by the Institute of Politics at Harvard Kennedy School found that 52% of young Americans believe American democracy is

A poll by the Institute of Politics at Harvard Kennedy School found that 52% of young Americans believe American democracy is “in trouble,” if not just “failing.”

Young Americans' lack of faith extended to President Joe Biden — just 46 percent said they approved of the president, compared to 59 percent last year

Young Americans’ lack of faith extended to President Joe Biden — just 46 percent said they approved of the president, compared to 59 percent last year

“After hitting record numbers in 2020, young Americans are sounding the alarm. When they look at the America they will soon inherit, they see a democracy and climate at risk — and Washington as more interested in confrontation than compromise,” said IOP Polling Director John Della Volpe.

“Nevertheless, they seem determined as ever to fight for the change they seek.”

58 percent of respondents said strengthening the economy was the most important key to a successful presidency, while 45 percent said uniting the province was most important and 42 percent said it improved health care.

58 percent of respondents said strengthening the economy was the key to a successful presidency, while 45 percent believed uniting the province was the most important

58 percent of respondents said strengthening the economy was the key to a successful presidency, while 45 percent believed uniting the province was the most important

Most young Americans said they don't believe a civil war will break out in their lifetime, and only 35 percent say it's a possibility

Most young Americans said they don’t believe a civil war will break out in their lifetime, and only 35 percent say it’s a possibility

While the majority had a bleak view of the country’s future, most young Americans said they don’t believe a civil war will break out in their lifetime, and only 35 percent say it’s a possibility.

The survey found that despite the divided political environment, by a 2-to-1 margin, most young adults said they value political compromise over confrontation, preferring “elected officials meet in the middle — at the expense of of my favorite policy priorities. ‘

IOP director Mark Gearan said many in Washington could learn from that mindset.

“Our political leaders on both sides of the aisle would benefit immensely from hearing the concerns expressed by our students and young voters about the challenges our democracy faces and their sincere desire that our parties find a common ground for solutions.” ‘, he said.

The study also found that 56 percent of young Americans expect climate change to influence their future decisions, and 45 percent said they are already seeing the local effects of climate change.

The Institute of Politics at Harvard Kennedy School surveyed 2,109 Americans, ages 18 to 29.  Shown: stock image of students

The Institute of Politics at Harvard Kennedy School surveyed 2,109 Americans, ages 18 to 29. Shown: stock image of students

Young Americans also reported poor mental health: 51 percent of young adults said they felt down, depressed, and hopeless, and 25 percent reported thoughts of harming themselves multiple times in the past two weeks.

In addition, the poll found that the COVID-19 pandemic has seriously affected young Americans.

Half of respondents said they are a different person because of COVID-19, while 51 percent said the pandemic has negatively affected them.

The negative effect of the nearly two-year pandemic comes as the Omicron variant has spread to several countries around the world after emerging last month.

Public health experts are still assessing the risks of Omicron, which has several troubling mutations that suggest it could spread quickly and potentially evade immunity from vaccines or previous infections.

Despite the species being spotted in 38 countries, the World Health Organization (WHO) said no one has died with the new super mutant.

The Omicron variant was discovered last week by South African health officials, and while not much is known about it, it has recently been found to be 2.4 times more contagious than previous variants.

Due to the high number of mutations, the vaccine is also believed to be evasive, although the cases were usually very mild.

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