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Mohammad Skaf: Loathed gang rapist BLOWS UP at media

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Notorious gang rapist Mohammed Skaf lost his temper with reporters just 48 hours after he walked free from prison.

The 38-year-old, who along with his brother orchestrated a series of gang rapes which terrorised Australia ahead of the 2000 Olympics, was released into the community on Wednesday after serving a 21-year prison sentence.

He was pictured wearing the same salmon-coloured shirt he wore on Thursday as he reported to Corrections Officers at Bankstown to comply with parole.

‘You’ll be charged with trespassing,’ he shouted at waiting photographers when he arrived home.

Skaf tried to cover his face with paperwork from the child protection register as he ordered a mystery woman who was with him to take photos of the press.

His face wrinkled and turned red behind his face mask and sunglasses as he screamed at reporters from the front of his parents’ home in Greenacre in Sydney’s south-west.

Notorious gang rapist Mohammed Skaf lost his temper with reporters just 48 hours after he walked free from prison

The 38-year-old, who along with his brother orchestrated a series of gang rapes which terrorised Australia ahead of the 2000 Olympics, was released into the community on Wednesday after serving a 21-year prison sentence

The 38-year-old, who along with his brother orchestrated a series of gang rapes which terrorised Australia ahead of the 2000 Olympics, was released into the community on Wednesday after serving a 21-year prison sentence

A woman, believed to be Skaf's sister Noura, was pictured filming media while her borther yelled

A woman, believed to be Skaf’s sister Noura, was pictured filming media while her borther yelled  

On Thursday, Skaf got into a car with his sister and mother Baria for his mandatory parole meeting at about 2pm donning a pink t-shirt, dark sunglasses, flashy Nike footwear, black shorts and a visible ankle bracelet that will be used to monitor him 24 hours a day. 

He entered the Bankstown Community Corrections office on Rickard Road, where he will have to check in regularly as part of his strict release conditions which will see him under heavy surveillance for the next 26 months.

He was originally handed to a record 32-year prison sentence over the terrifying string of sexual assaults in Sydney involving at least 14 other men, including his ringleader brother Bilal.

But with his non-parole period up he was released back into the community on Wednesday from Long Bay prison, moving into his family with his parents, sister and younger brother.

The home is just metres from a park where one of the sickening attacks took place.

The convicted rapist (pictured with his sister and mother Baria) appeared relaxed and could be seen wearing his ankle braclet

The convicted rapist (pictured with his sister and mother Baria) appeared relaxed and could be seen wearing his ankle braclet

Few crimes in recent Australian history have stirred more community outrage and fear than the series of pack rapes committed by the group of young Lebanese-Australian men targeting ‘white women’ in the lead up to the 2000 Olympics.

One of the victims, an 18-year-old woman, was raped 40 times by 14 men over four hours in an attack coordinated by mobile phone. She was then dumped at a train station after being hosed down.

During her ordeal the woman was called an ‘Aussie pig’, told she was going to get it ‘Leb-style’ and asked if ‘Leb c*** tasted better than Aussie c***’.

Many of the rapists have never been identified and police fear there were more victims who did not come forward.  

Skaf has never publicly displayed any remorse for his heinous crimes and has repeatedly blamed his victims.

Few crimes in recent Australian history have stirred more community outrage and fear than the series of pack rapes committed by the group of young Lebanese-Australian men targeting 'white women' in the lead up to the 2000 Olympics. Pictured: Skaf emerges from the car with his mother

Few crimes in recent Australian history have stirred more community outrage and fear than the series of pack rapes committed by the group of young Lebanese-Australian men targeting ‘white women’ in the lead up to the 2000 Olympics. Pictured: Skaf emerges from the car with his mother 

Skaf entered the Bankstown Community Corrections office on Rickard Road (pictured), where the convicted will have to check in regularly as part of his strict release conditions which will see him under heavy surveillance for the next 26 months

Skaf entered the Bankstown Community Corrections office on Rickard Road (pictured), where the convicted will have to check in regularly as part of his strict release conditions which will see him under heavy surveillance for the next 26 months

Skaf (pictured with his mother and sister) has never publicly displayed any remorse for his heinous crimes and has repeatedly blamed his victims

Skaf (pictured with his mother and sister) has never publicly displayed any remorse for his heinous crimes and has repeatedly blamed his victims

But with his maximum sentence expiring on January 1, 2024, the parole board feared if Skaf were to have served his full term in prison then authorities would have had no control over his reintegration back into the community when he finally got out. 

A decision was therefore made to grant Skaf parole so he could be closely supervised while living with his family who have lived on the street for decades.

When Skaf returned from his parole meeting in the front seat of the family’s white sedan, he took great care to help his mother out of vehicle before they disappeared down the driveway inside the home.

Earlier this morning online shopping boxes were dropped off at the property before an Uber Eats delivery driver also stopped by. 

Some normality appears to be returning to quiet family street with well-kept lawns and gardens after the infamous figure who has spend the majority of his life behind bars was allowed to walk free from jail.   

Mohammed Skaf hides behind his parole papers after being released from Long Bay's Metropolitan Special Programs Centre on Wednesday

Mohammed Skaf hides behind his parole papers after being released from Long Bay’s Metropolitan Special Programs Centre on Wednesday

Skaf emerged from Long Bay’s Metropolitan Special Programs Centre about 9.45am wearing a white Hugo Boss top, black track pants, sunglasses and Covid-19 mask.

He was then driven to the family’s home to his waiting parents, sister and younger brother; shouts of excitement could be heard from inside the newly-renovated house.

But some neighbours didn’t share the same joy, instead telling waiting media they were anxious about his return to the street. 

As he stepped into a Toyota Corolla driven by a Corrective Services officer reporters asked ‘Are you happy to be free?’ and ‘Are you sorry for what you’ve done?’ He did not respond. 

Three boxes of Skaf’s belongings were carried inside by Corrective Services officers who then left the property as news crews set up camp on the footpath.

Two women visited about 11am and left 25 minutes later. A man and a woman, who appeared to be Community Corrections officers, arrived about 2pm. There was no other movement at the house.

Pictured: A woman arrives at the Skaf family home after Mohammed Skaf was released from jail on Wednesday morning

Pictured: A woman arrives at the Skaf family home after Mohammed Skaf was released from jail on Wednesday morning

Pictured: Mohammed Skaf arriving home for the first time in 21 years

Someone captures Mohammed Skaf's return home through the window of the Greenacre property

Mohammed Skaf was accompanied to his family home in Greenacre by Correctional Services officers (left). Someone filmed the scene through the window of the property (right)

Neighbours showed little interest in the scene unfolding on their street but many had known Skaf was coming home.

Skaf had remained unrepentant during his time in custody and chose not to address the media when attempts were made to speak to him through an intercom.

‘I’m not a rapist,’ he said two years ago after yet again being refused parole. ‘How can I have empathy for someone that wasn’t raped by me?

‘I’ve maintained my innocence for the last 19 years and I’ll ­maintain my innocence until the day I die.’

Skaf has supposedly accepted some responsibility for his actions since he made those comments and indicated a wish to get married, have children, find a job and study architecture.

Skaf brought two boxes of his possessions home from the Long Bay correctional centre on Wednesday (pictured)

Skaf brought two boxes of his possessions home from the Long Bay correctional centre on Wednesday (pictured)

Notorious pack rapist Mohammed Skaf walks out of Sydney's Long Bay correctional complex on Wednesday morning after spending most of his life in custody

Notorious pack rapist Mohammed Skaf walks out of Sydney’s Long Bay correctional complex on Wednesday morning after spending most of his life in custody

Mohammed Skaf was released from jail on Wednesday and live with his parents, younger brother and sister (family home pictured)

Mohammed Skaf was released from jail on Wednesday and live with his parents, younger brother and sister (family home pictured)

Gang rapist Mohammed Skaf after his arrest at the age of 17

Gang rapist Mohammed Skaf after his arrest at the age of 17

When he was first locked up as a teenager there was no Facebook or Instagram and no smart phones. The World Trade Centre was still standing and John Howard was not even halfway through his four terms as prime minister.

‘The world has changed,’ Skaf said in 2019. ‘I’m still living in the early 2000s.’

The Skaf gang pack raped at least six women and girls who were were held against their will and repeatedly sexually assaulted in four attacks that shocked Australia and raised racial tensions to fever pitch in NSW.

One woman was raped 25 times by 14 attackers at three locations as she was called an ‘Aussie pig’ in an ordeal that lasted six hours.

Skaf, who was convicted in relation to two of the rapes, was 17 at the time of the offences. His brother Bilal was almost 19 and is now 40.

Original sentencing judge Michael Finnane, who jailed Mohammed for 32 years in October 2002, described the gang’s crimes as ‘worse than murder’. 

Following a series of further convictions and appeals that term was reduced to a maximum of 22 years, 11 months and 30 days.

Skaf’s non-parole period on 16 years, 11 months and 30 days expired on January 1, 2018, more than three and a half years ago. 

Skaf wore an ankle monitor as he walked out of prison, as his strict parole conditions include 24-hour electronic tracking

Skaf wore an ankle monitor as he walked out of prison, as his strict parole conditions include 24-hour electronic tracking

As well as 24-hour electronic monitoring, Skaf will have to keep to a daily schedule and comply with ongoing psychological intervention

As well as 24-hour electronic monitoring, Skaf will have to keep to a daily schedule and comply with ongoing psychological intervention

Bilal Skaf (above) is serving a 31-year prison sentence with a non-parole period of 28 years

Mohammed Skaf (above) was released from Long Bay jail on Wednesday

Mohammed Skaf (right) was released on Wednesday from Long Bay jail. Bilal Skaf (left) will be eligible for parole in 2033. He is serving a minimum term of 28 years with a maximum of 31

An artist's impression of Mohammed Skaf at a hearing before the State Parole Authority in February.  The SPA determined freeing Mohammed at the end of his 23-year sentence in early 2024 without any conditions would have posed an unacceptable risk to society

An artist’s impression of Mohammed Skaf at a hearing before the State Parole Authority in February.  The SPA determined freeing Mohammed at the end of his 23-year sentence in early 2024 without any conditions would have posed an unacceptable risk to society

Skaf’s sister, who along with his mother was recently diagnosed with Covid-19, told Daily Mail Australia the family was ready to welcome her brother home.

‘We’re looking forward to him coming home and hopefully he’ll start a life that we’ve never experienced before,’ she said. ‘We’re pretty excited and happy for him to come home.’  

The prisoner was considered a low to medium risk of ‘general re-offending’ but one Corrective Services psychologist assessed him as in the ‘well above average’ range of committing further sex offences. 

Skaf had lately been held in the minimum-security Kirkconnell Correctional Centrex, about 180km west of Sydney, between Lithgow and Bathurst. 

He was moved to Long Bay late last week ahead of his release on parole.  

Skaf was considered a low to medium risk of ‘general re-offending’ but one Corrective Services psychologist assessed him as in the ‘well above average’ range of committing further sex offences. 

Earlier this year he was engaged in 30 days of work on community projects at Bathurst showground and local churches and was reported to have toiled diligently.

Skaf was flanked by a corrections officer and lawyers  as he walked to a waiting car

Skaf emerges from Long Bay jail wearing a face mask, his first taste of freedom in more than 20 years

As well as 24-hour electronic monitoring, Skaf will have to keep to a daily schedule and comply with ongoing psychological intervention.

 As well as 24-hour electronic monitoring, Skaf will have to keep to a daily schedule and comply with ongoing psychological intervention.

Skaf tried to avoid the cameras as he got into the car to be driven to his mother's home

Skaf tried to avoid the cameras as he got into the car to be driven to his mother’s home

He had completed the High Intensity Sex Offenders Program in a ‘satisfactory manner’ and the Real Understanding Self Help course where he was described as a ‘consistently committed participant’. 

The State Parole Authority (SPA) granted Skaf’s release on September 17 under strict conditions including 24-hour electronic monitoring. 

‘Every determinate sentence imposed by a court comes to an end,’ the authority said in a statement. ‘Ordinarily, release is inevitable. 

‘It is clearly important to provide some structure to facilitate re-integration in the interests of community safety. 

‘Release without the opportunity for structure or supervision makes little sense in terms of community protection.’ 

Skaf’s behaviour in prison had significant improved over the past two years and he retained strong family support. 

Skaf's mother and younger sister were recently diagnosed with Covid and were self-isolating at their Greenacre home (pictured) along with his father and younger brother

Skaf’s mother and younger sister were recently diagnosed with Covid and were self-isolating at their Greenacre home (pictured) along with his father and younger brother 

‘It is also reported that there has been a considerable shift in the applicant’s understanding of the aggravated sexual assault conviction, to the extent that he accepts that ‘perhaps’ consent had not been given by the victim,’ the SPA found.

‘The applicant reflected that he ‘was then 17 years and is now 38 and he would never be in that situation again’. 

‘The authority accepts that there has been some belated attitudinal shift, but not such as constitutes any real acknowledgement of the gross criminal conduct described by the sentencing judges.’ 

Skaf has been offered post-release employment and his family’s recently renovated home was previously assessed as suitable by Community Corrections. 

Community Corrections reviewed that arrangement after youngest sibling Hadi pleaded guilty to supplying cocaine and dealing with the proceeds of crime. 

The Skaf family home is about 1.7km from Gosling Park (above) where one of the Skaf gang's pack rapes occurred on August 12, 2000.  Mohammed lured a 16-year-old girl to the park where Bilal and another gang member raped her while a dozen others stood around laughing.

The Skaf family home is about 1.7km from Gosling Park (above) where one of the Skaf gang’s pack rapes occurred on August 12, 2000.  Mohammed lured a 16-year-old girl to the park where Bilal and another gang member raped her while a dozen others stood around laughing.

Hadi Skaf, whose older brothers are notorious pack rapists Bilal and Mohammed Skaf, has been caught supplying cocaine in Sydney

Hadi Skaf, whose older brothers are notorious pack rapists Bilal and Mohammed Skaf, has been caught supplying cocaine in Sydney

It is understood the difference between the nature of Mohammed and 22-year-old Hadi’s offending would not stop the former staying in the family home. 

The Skafs live on a quiet bottlebrush-lined street about 1.7km from Gosling Park where one of the gang’s pack rapes was committed on August 12, 2000.

Mohammed had lured a 16-year-old girl he knew to the park where Bilal and a second gang member raped her while a dozen more young men stood around laughing. 

The second gang member held a gun to the teen’s head and kicked her in the stomach before she was able to escape. 

Less than three weeks after the Gosling Park attack, on August 30, 2000, Mohammed was the leader of four young men who approached an 18-year-old woman at Bankstown train station.  

Skaf took the woman’s phone and led her to public toilets in nearby Marion Street where he told her: ‘You won’t get your phone back until you f*** me.’

When the young woman refused Skaf said, ‘I’m going to f*** you Leb-style’, turned her around and raped her against a wall.

The SPA described the following ‘horrendous’ assaults committed upon the victim by the rest of the gang that night as violent, degrading and disgusting. 

The woman was raped 25 times by 14 attackers at three locations in an ordeal that lasted six hours. She was asked if ‘Leb c*** tasted better than Aussie c***’ before being sprayed with an industrial hose. 

Judge Finnane had compared the Skaf gang’s depravity to outrages committed by invading armies in times of war.

‘These were not random attacks and, in my view, they were aimed at creating terror in the community,’ Judge Finnane found.

Bilal Skaf led a gang of young Lebanese-Australian males on a pack rape spree across Sydney's south west in 2000. He is pictured outside the NSW Supreme Court in July 2006

Bilal Skaf led a gang of young Lebanese-Australian males on a pack rape spree across Sydney’s south west in 2000. He is pictured outside the NSW Supreme Court in July 2006

He described Skaf as a menace to civilised society, and while Bilal – who was not eligible for parole until 2033 – had been the gang’s nominal commander, Mohammed had also taken a leadership role.

‘As the facts show, he, although quite young, is a vicious, cowardly bully, arrogant and a liar, as well as being a rapist,’ Judge Finnane said. 

The SPA noted Judge Finnane found Skaf had shown no remorse and continued to blame the victims for his crimes during his trials, observing he had been an ‘arrogant and nasty individual in custody’. 

The SPA had no legislative power to hold Skaf in prison beyond the end of his full 23-year sentence but could keep him under supervision by granting parole. 

While acknowledging the distress that decision might cause Skaf’s victims and the wider community, careful consideration had to be given to reintegrating him into the community. 

SPA chairman David Frearson SC said intensive supervision for the last two years and two months of Skaf’s maximum sentence was the safest available option.

‘This is the only opportunity to supervise a safe transition into the community in the small window of time that we have left,’ Judge Frearson said.

‘Release without structure or supervision makes little sense for community protection.’

Mohammed Skaf had his sperm frozen while in custody at Long Bay jail (pictured) before undergoing cancer treatment so he could still father children when he got out. He was told chemotherapy would make him infertile and was 'devastated' at the prospect of being childless

Mohammed Skaf had his sperm frozen while in custody at Long Bay jail (pictured) before undergoing cancer treatment so he could still father children when he got out. He was told chemotherapy would make him infertile and was ‘devastated’ at the prospect of being childless

As well as 24-hour electronic monitoring, Skaf will have to keep to a daily schedule and comply with ongoing psychological intervention.

He is banned from any form of contact with his victims or co-offenders and cannot visit the Liverpool, Fairfield, Blacktown or Parramatta council areas.

The Skaf family home is within the nearby Canterbury-Bankstown local government  boundaries. 

Community Corrections pre-release reports confirmed there had been a ‘significant improvement’ in Skaf’s behaviour and attitude towards his offending.

Skaf had his sperm frozen early in his sentence before undergoing chemotherapy so he could still father children after he was let out of jail. 

He was rendered infertile following the treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma but the sperm sample was kept in storage.  

Skaf gang rapes were ‘worse than murder’  

Bilal Skaf led a gang of more than a dozen young Lebanese Australians who committed four pack rapes on six teenagers in late 2000.

Among the gang members was Bilal’s younger brother Mohammed. 

One of the victims, an 18-year-old woman, was raped 25 times by 14 gang members over six hours in an attack coordinated by mobile phone. She was then dumped at a train station after being hosed down.

During her ordeal the woman was called an ‘Aussie pig’, told she was going to be raped ‘Leb-style’ and asked if ‘Leb c*** tasted better than Aussie c***’.

Judge Michael Finnane compared the Skaf gang’s depravity to outrages committed by invading armies in times of war and said their crimes were ‘worse than murder’.

‘These were not random attacks and, in my view, they were aimed at creating terror in the community,’ Judge Finnane said.

‘It seemed clear to me that these men were sending out a message to the community in Sydney. Skaf and the members of this gang clearly wanted public recognition for what they had done.’

None of the rapists expressed any remorse for their crimes at their trials.

Only Bilal Skaf is still in jail for the attacks.

Some of the rapists have never been identified and police fear there were more victims who did not come forward.

Skaf’s plans to have children after his brush with cancer were detailed in a NSW Court of Criminal Appeal judgment handed down in September 2005.

He was diagnosed with cancer in November 2002, a month after his original sentence was imposed, and underwent six months of chemotherapy.

Skaf claimed his health scare ‘made him more compassionate and understanding of other people’s pain and suffering, particularly those trying to combat cancer’, according to the CCA’s findings. 

The same judgement revealed Skaf moaning about being separated from his family and not having fresh fruit and vegetables to eat as he battled the disease. 

The CCA noted Skaf felt ‘isolated’ and ‘dehumanised’, and wept as he tried to cope with his ‘day-to-day mental and physical suffering’.

The chemotherapy was successful but Skaf complained he still faced the likelihood of not being able to have sons and daughters of his own. 

Skaf said doctors felt he was probably sterile for the rest of his life and the sperm sample taken before his chemotherapy could only be stored for ten years. 

[There is no definitive time limit for a high-quality sperm sample to remain viable after being frozen inside liquid nitrogen. There have been successful pregnancies from sperm frozen for more than 20 years]. 

‘The applicant has deposed that he is ‘devastated’ by the information that he is now sterile and that he is having medication for depression and that he feels ‘constantly stressed’,’ the CCA found.

A clinical psychologist who assessed Skaf in October 2003 recorded his reaction to facing the disease and treatment.

‘During his life threatening and extremely debilitating illness, Mr Skaf had to endure limited reassurance and comfort from his family, which is normally considered necessary for a successful recovery from a serious cancer,’ the psychologist wrote.

‘Mr Skaf told me that on several occasions he lost his composure and cried.’

At the same time, Skaf complained he did not have access to education programs ‘to keep his mind occupied’, the psychologist reported.

‘Mr Skaf told me that during the acute phase of his treatment, he had been tempted to end his life but that the thought of the pain this would cause his parents and his siblings and this stopped him.’

‘Mr Skaf is a depressed and anxious young man who is trying to recover from a life threatening lymphatic cancer.

‘Since his serious life threatening illness, Mr Skaf appears to demonstrate greater insight into other people’s suffering and struggles.

‘He expressed the desire to understand and explore the meaning of his life and the possibilities for a future constructive life.’

It is not known if the sperm sample taken from Skaf is still viable.

Skaf gang rampage: A timeline 

Gang rapist Bilal Skaf pictured in Goulburn's Supermax prison with his mother who was banned by prison authorities after she smuggled letters from her son out of the jail

Gang rapist Bilal Skaf pictured in Goulburn’s Supermax prison with his mother who was banned by prison authorities after she smuggled letters from her son out of the jail

August 10, 2000: Two teenagers aged 17 and 18 were offered drugs. They were taken by car to the gang, who were waiting at Northcote Park in Greenacre. The pair was forced to perform sex acts on eight men.  

August 12, 2000: Mohammed Skaf took a 16-year-old friend to his brother and friends at Gosling Park, Greenacre. Bilal Skaf and another male raped the girl in front of 12 men.

August 30, 2000: An 18-year-old woman was raped at Bankstown by Mohammed Skaf who told her he was going to ‘f**k her Leb style’. She was taken to two other locations and raped and assaulted by 14 men for six hours.

September 4, 2000:   16-year-old girls were taken from Beverly Hills train station to a home where they were repeatedly raped by three men over a five-hour period. 

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