Latest Breaking News & Top Headlines

Minnesota senator’s wife charged with domestic violence after hitting him with a broomstick

0

Minnesota state senator’s wife is accused of domestic violence after she ‘beat her ALS-stricken husband with a broomstick and threatened him with a knife’

  • Charlotte A. Tomassoni, 69, was charged with domestic violence
  • She is said to have hit her husband David with a computer and a broomstick on Sunday
  • She also threatened to stab him with a knife if he left their basement, police say
  • David said he was afraid he couldn’t defend himself because of his ALS
  • The disease affects the brain and spinal cord, impairing motor functions
  • Charlotte slurped her words and smelled of alcohol, according to officers
  • In 2012, she was charged with drink-driving and sentenced to two years’ probation
  • David was elected a Democrat to the Minnesota Senate in 2000, but is now independent after splitting from his party last year










The wife of a Minnesota state senator has been arrested after she beat him with a broomstick Sunday night and threatened to stab him after a drunken argument over “past family dynamics.”

Charlotte A. Tomassoni, 69, allegedly threw a computer from her husband David Tomassoni while he was in the couple’s basement at their home near Hibbing, about 75 miles (75 km) northwest of Duluth, according to a police report.

She also allegedly beat him with a broomstick and threatened to stab him with a knife if he went back upstairs, police said.

State Senator Tomassoni, 68, feared he would not be able to defend himself because “he has lost much of his upper-body strength” after being diagnosed with ALS in June, according to Chisholm Police.

David Tomassoni, 68, is the president of the closely divided Minnesota State Senate

Charlotte A. Tomassoni (left) was charged with domestic violence Sunday night after allegedly beating her husband David Tomassoni (right) at their home near Hibbing, Minnesota

ALS, also called Lou Gehrig’s disease, is an incurable degenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, according to the ALS Association.

Those affected eventually lose the ability to speak, eat, move and breathe.

sen. Tomassoni told police his wife was “intoxicated and maybe on something high” when officers arrived at the house at 6:36 p.m., according to the Duluth News Tribune.

She was reportedly upset about “the family dynamics” from the past, and David told police he left the house so she could “cool down for a while,” but he later returned around 4:30 p.m. to watch the Minnesota Vikings game on TV. to watch.

He claims he then went into the basement, where she allegedly hit him in the chest with the broomstick and threatened to stab him.

Officers say they found Charlotte on the living room couch with two 12-year-old packs of beer on the floor, along with several empty bottles on the coffee table and around the couch.

They patted her for weapons and noted that she reeked of alcohol and slurped her words, according to the report.

Officers also saw two steak knives on the kitchen table.

David Tomassoni, pictured above in 2004, was diagnosed with the degenerative neurological disorder ALS in June.  He told officers he was afraid he could not defend himself against his wife

David Tomassoni, pictured above in 2004, was diagnosed with the degenerative neurological disorder ALS in June. He told officers he was afraid he could not defend himself against his wife

Charlotte was charged with domestic violence, which under Minnesota law is punishable by up to 90 days in prison, a $1,000 fine, or both.

On Monday, she pleaded not guilty and was released on parole. Her next court date is October 4.

In 2012, she was convicted of fourth-degree driving while having a disability and given two years of supervised probation, the News Tribune reports.

sen. Tomassoni represents the 6th district, which includes the Iron Range and parts of the rural counties of St. Louis and Itasca. According to the Minnesota Star Tribune, he was first elected to the state Senate in 2000, and now serves as pro tem Senate president.

He first noticed ALS symptoms last year, telling the Star Tribune that it started with his having trouble using his left hand to tuck sheets on a bed or turning his collar.

The longtime Democrat split from the state party and formed an independent caucus in the closely divided Minnesota Senate last year, citing increased polarization.

Advertisement

.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.