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Metropolitan Police officers who exchanged sick WhatsApp messages with Wayne Couzens are still on duty

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Two Metropolitan Police officers who exchanged highly abusive messages with killer Wayne Couzens are still on duty, it turned out last night.

The agents are said to have been part of a WhatsApp group with officers from three forces that were under investigation after Couzens’ phone was seized after his arrest.

They are alleged to have been left in service even after being placed under criminal investigation for allegedly exchanging sexist and racist messages with the sexual predator.

Two Metropolitan Police officers who exchanged highly abusive messages with killer Wayne Couzens are still on duty

The revelation will raise new concerns about a culture of misogyny in the Corps and the adequacy of officer vetting procedures.

It also raises questions about further missed opportunities to investigate Couzens earlier.

Yesterday, Sue Fish, a former chief of police for Nottinghamshire, criticized the Met’s decision not to suspend officers under investigation. ‘That’s unbelievable. That clearly shows that the Met doesn’t understand … doesn’t understand the seriousness,” she told The Guardian.

The Met’s decision stands in stark contrast to the actions of other troops who have suspended officers as the investigation continues.

According to the police watchdog, the alleged “vile” posts denigrating women began in March 2019, just months after Couzens joined Scotland Yard in September 2018.

With Assistant Commissioner Nick Ephgrave has admitted vetting procedures were not properly followed when Couzens joined.

Officers who failed to check his vehicle allegedly linked the killer to a 2015 report of indecent exposure.

The Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) is reviewing dozens of messages exchanged between the group of officers between March and October 2019, including officers from the Civil Nuclear and Norfolk Police.

Sue Fish, a former Nottinghamshire Police Chief, criticized the Met's decision not to suspend officers under investigation.

Sue Fish, a former Nottinghamshire Police Chief, criticized the Met’s decision not to suspend officers under investigation.

At the time, Couzens worked in Bromley, South East London, for Safer Neighborhood Teams before transferring to the Parliamentary and Diplomatic Protection Command in 2020.

It emerged yesterday that the IOPC has decided not to investigate Couzens, but to focus on serving officers accused of sending discriminatory and inappropriate messages and not provoking Couzens.

An IOPC spokesperson said: “Due to the criminal charges and subsequent pleas of guilty by Wayne Couzens for the murder, kidnapping and rape of Sarah Everard, it was not considered appropriate to investigate him as a subject in a behavioral investigation. .’

Yesterday, the Met said two agents with limited duties had been posted. A third former Met officer is also under investigation.

Yesterday, Lord Paddick, a former deputy assistant commissioner at the Met and now the Lib Dems spokesperson for the home affairs in the House of Lords, said there must be a “cultural change” at the Met.

“I wouldn’t go so far as to call it institutional misogyny, but I would describe it as widespread sexism within the police force, and we need police leaders to recognize bias within the police force,” he told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. .

Norfolk Constabulary said: “We can confirm that the officer has been suspended while the charges are being investigated.”

The Civil Nuclear Constabulary said: “The officer in question was suspended in August as soon as we became aware of the IOPC investigation.”

The Ex-Met Chief’s Bomb: As Revealed, Wayne Couzens Was Named As McDonald’s Flash THREE DAYS BEFORE Sarah Everard’s Murder, But Police Didn’t See He Was A Cop – Now Cressida Dick MUST Be Responsible

Wayne Couzens was named as a suspect in a sexual offense 72 hours before he killed Sarah Everard, it emerged for the first time last night.

The revelation came as former Met Commissioner Lord Stevens put pressure on Cressida Dick, saying she should question whether she bears any responsibility for the failures in the case.

CCTV evidence of a car involved in an alleged flash incident at a McDonald’s drive-in in February this year generated the name ‘Wayne Couzens’ as a suspect on Metropolitan Police systems – and gave his address.

Wayne Couzens was named a sex offender suspect 72 hours before he killed Sarah Everard

Wayne Couzens was named a sex offender suspect 72 hours before he killed Sarah Everard

But officers didn’t realize he was a duty officer and further investigations were only made after Miss Everard’s disappearance on March 3.

And last night, a former head of Scotland Yard said Police Chief Dame Cressida should be held responsible for a “horrific series of blunders” in the case.

In a sharp rebuke, Lord Stevens, who served as Met commissioner between 2000 and 2005, said: “You have to look at yourself and say, can I go on? Can I continue with confidence?

“Can I continue in the way that brings the change needed to make the public feel safe – and in this particular case, women safe. Also, do we have people in the police who shouldn’t be there?’

It came as damning new claims emerged about Met police blunders.

Couzens’ car was reported to have been reported by staff at a McDonald’s restaurant in Swanley, Kent, after two female employees said they had been flashed by a motorist there on Feb. 7 and again on Feb. 27. The complaint was filed on February 28 .

A former Scotland Yard head said Police Chief Dame Cressida should be held responsible for a 'terrible series of blunders'

A former Scotland Yard head said Police Chief Dame Cressida should be held responsible for a ‘terrible series of blunders’

But last night, it came to light that CCTV evidence showing his license plate had brought up Couzens’ name as a suspect on Met’s police systems.

Yesterday, a McDonald’s employee who was flashed by the sexual predator taunted officers for “not acting fast enough.” The employee, who declined to be named, said: ‘The police have requested our statements and have taken CCTV footage. If they had taken this more seriously, they could have easily found out that he was a police officer who committed these crimes.

“The police had three days to stop him, but they didn’t. It could have kept him from doing much worse.’

Lord Stevens did not call for the resignation of Dame Cressida, but suggested she could not restore confidence in Britain’s largest police force after Couzens, one of her officers, was sentenced to life in prison for the murder of Miss Everard – a 33-year-old marketing manager.

Former Met Commissioner Lord Stevens put pressure on Cressida Dick, saying she should ask herself if she bears any responsibility

Former Met Commissioner Lord Stevens put pressure on Cressida Dick, saying she should ask herself if she bears any responsibility

He also criticized the force’s vetting procedures, describing them as “unfit for purpose” after an “extraordinary story of blunders” that allowed a man nicknamed “the rapist” to join the police force. Veterinary officers were unable to verify Couzens’ vehicle record, which would have linked it to an indecent exposure in Kent in 2015, when Couzens was reported by a male motorist driving naked from the waist down.

With Assistant Commissioner Nick Ephgrave has said Couzens would still have joined the police even if the vetting officers had known that Kent Police – then one of their own special agents – had not identified Couzens as the driver and decided that it deserved no further action.

Lord Stevens told LBC: ‘The fact that… [Couzens] in 2015 he was seen riding around from the waist down with no clothes on, the fact that he was called a rapist, the fact that he was a very strange person, i mean there is no way that man had gotten a gun.. the vetting process is clearly not fit for purpose.”

It has emerged that Couzens reportedly shared highly abusive sexual messages in which women were abused in a WhatsApp group with five officers on duty, including three from the Met, just months after he joined the police.

Police Secretary Kit Malthouse warned that police still have a long way to go to regain public trust. He said the killing had “dealed a devastating blow to people’s trust in police officers, but also in the Met police in particular.”

A Met spokesperson said: “The Met received a charge of indecent exposure about 72 hours before Sarah was kidnapped. That crime was assigned for investigation, but by the time of Sarah’s kidnapping, it was still unfinished.”

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