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Man finds tooth in NOSE in rare case of ‘ectopic tooth’ affecting ability to breathe

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Man, 38, finds tooth in his NOSE in rare case of ‘ectopic tooth’ affecting his ability to breathe

  • A 38-year-old man was discovered with a tooth in his nose by doctors at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City
  • Man went for treatment after years of difficulty breathing from his right nostril
  • An initial examination found he had a deviated septum and a rhinoscopy found the protruding tooth
  • Surgery was performed to remove the tooth and three months later, the man told doctors that his breathing problems had disappeared
  • Entopic teeth are rare, occurring in less than 1% of the population, though health officials warn patients should get them treated if discovered










A new case report details a strange incident in which a man was discovered to have had a tooth stuck in his nose.

The 38-year-old, who was not named in the report published by Mount Sinai Health System in New York City, said he had trouble breathing through his right nostril for years.

Doctors examined him and found a “hard, not soft, white mass” while performing a rhinoscopy, which they later determined was an ectopic tooth.

Ectopic body parts or functions – meaning they take place where they shouldn’t be – are extremely rare,

Although ectopic teeth are more common than other ectopic body parts, it is particularly rare for one to appear in the nose.

An unnamed 38-year-old man was discovered to have an ectopic tooth growing inside his nose. He went to the doctor and reported respiratory problems that had plagued him for years, and a rhinoscopy revealed the tooth. Pictured: The man’s tooth erupts in his nose, photographed during a rhinoscopy

Entopic teeth are rare, and when they do occur, it's usually not that serious for a person's tooth to shift so much that it lodges in the nose.  Pictured: An X-ray showing the man's tooth in the nose

Entopic teeth are rare, and when they do occur, it’s usually not that serious for a person’s tooth to shift so much that it lodges in the nose. Pictured: An X-ray showing the man’s tooth in the nose

Doctors, who published a report on the man Thursday in The New England Journal of Medicine, said the man had no other history of facial trauma or abnormalities.

An initial examination of the man on Mount Sinai found a deviated septum and calcified septal spurs.

They then performed a rhinoscopy, which occurs when doctors insert a small camera and light into a person’s nose and find the white object.

X-rays determined it was an ectopic tooth that had grown from the mouth to the nose.

The man had surgery to remove the tooth and it was successful with no complications.

Three months after the procedure, the doctors report that his breathing problems have disappeared.

Ectopic teeth are rare, but not an entirely new concept for many doctors.

“Sometimes one or more teeth develop in the wrong position, become lodged and remain buried in the jawbone below the gumline,” writes the National Health Service’s (NHS) Queen Victoria Hospital in Grinstead, England in a factsheet. about the condition.

“The most common ectopic teeth are the canines in the upper jaw.”

The agency warns that not getting treatment for these misplaced teeth can lead to further problems over time, such as misplacement of other teeth and tooth gaps.

The NHS warns that leaving entopic teeth behind could displace other teeth and lead to gaps in the teeth and other problems over time.  About 0.1% to 1% of people will suffer from an entopic tooth.  Pictured: An example of an entopic tooth published by the NHS

The NHS warns that leaving entopic teeth behind could displace other teeth and lead to gaps in the teeth and other problems over time. About 0.1% to 1% of people will suffer from an entopic tooth. Pictured: An example of an entopic tooth published by the NHS

“The greatest risk of this is that the tooth could bump into the roots of other adult teeth and cause damage,” the NHS factsheet reads.

“Sometimes this can make them feel wobbly and eventually need to be removed. A cyst may also form around the buried tooth.

“If you have a baby tooth and decide to keep it, it can be lost when you grow up. In that case, a gap remains that may need to be replaced with a false tooth by your general dentist.’

Ectopic teeth are believed to occur in 0.1 percent to one percent of people.

However, cases such as the man of Mount Sinai are incredibly rare, as teeth usually remain in the jaw or gums.

In this particular case, it seemed to “burst” upwards and make its way to its nose.

The overall size of the tooth is just 14 millimeters long, according to the published report.

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