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Luton Town assistant boss Mick Harford is ready for his fight against prostate cancer

Mick Harford ready for his fight against prostate cancer… with Luton Town’s assistant boss starting targeted radiation therapy next month after taking meds since Christmas

  • Mick Harford’s prostate cancer diagnosis came two days before Christmas
  • Since then, he has been using drugs in an attempt to shrink metastatic tumors
  • Surgery was made impossible, but he will start a course of targeted radiotherapy
  • The ex-striker takes time away from his job as assistant boss at Luton Town

Mick Harford has pledged to tackle prostate cancer with the same fierce spirit and courage that made him one of the best strikers in English football.

“This is the biggest fight,” said Harford, 62, after announcing his illness this week. ‘Mentally it’s tough, as everyone knows. It’s always in the back of your mind, but I’ve fought my way for a career and hopefully I can fight my way through it.

“I’ll have my ups and downs, but right now I’m fine. I’m in good hands, the NHS has been great and overall I’m in a good place, staying positive and overwhelmed with all the outpourings of support. I will keep fighting and stay strong.’

Mick Harford will start targeted radiotherapy next month after prostate cancer was diagnosed in December

Mick Harford will start targeted radiotherapy next month after prostate cancer was diagnosed in December

He has promised to tackle it with the same fierce spirit that has made him one of the best strikers in English football voetbal

He has promised to tackle it with the same fierce spirit that has made him one of the best strikers in English football voetbal

Harford’s diagnosis came two days before last Christmas. He has since been on drugs in an attempt to shrink tumors that had spread from his prostate to his groin and lymph nodes, making surgery impossible.

He will begin a course of targeted radiation therapy next month, shortly after the start of the new EFL season, and will take time off from his job as assistant boss at Luton Town, one of the 10 clubs he represented as a player.

“A lot of us footballers think we are invincible,” said Harford, who won two caps for England. “Many men are the same, but it’s not true. You can catch this at any time. Please, take a test and make sure you’re okay. We are vulnerable to this disease. It is the most common cancer in men.

‘We don’t know how to get it. I feel it has to do with my lifestyle: not living the right way in terms of food and nutrition. When I found out I had this, I changed my diet, cut out alcohol, lost some weight, and started exercising more.

He will be taking time off his job as an assistant boss at Luton Town, one of the 10 clubs he represented as a player

He will be taking time off his job as an assistant boss at Luton Town, one of the 10 clubs he represented as a player

“I feel great on the outside. Not so good inside. I’m in no pain other than the occasional backache, but I’m up and down to the toilet, and the flow is so bad, very slow it takes forever and once I’m done I go back two minutes later.”

Harford is determined to raise awareness. More than 11,500 men die of prostate cancer in the UK every year. The disease mainly affects men over 50, the risk increases with age and is higher for black men.

For more information and a 30-second online risk checker, visit: www.prostatecanceruk.org.

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