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LinkedIn becomes LATEST US social media app operating in China

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LinkedIn, the last major US social media platform operating in China, will shut down its networking service and turn to a job-seeking board after Beijing authorities give it 30 days to better regulate its content.

The decision, first reported by The Wall Street Journal, parent company Microsoft announced on Thursday.

LinkedIn joins other popular western social media apps like Facebook, Google, Twitter, YouTube, Reddit, Zoom, Instagram, WhatsApp, Twitch and many more that are blocked in mainland China.

Those companies have been banned in China for years after they rejected government demands to censor user content.

“While we will be terminating the localized version of LinkedIn in China later this year, we will continue to have a strong presence in China to drive our new strategy and are excited to launch the new InJobs app later this year,” a LinkedIn spokesperson said. told DailyMail.com.

LinkedIn will no longer offer its networking platform to users in China due to increased censorship demands from the Beijing government, it was announced Thursday.

The announcement was made Thursday by Microsoft, LinkedIn's parent company, which acquired the service in 2016 for $26.2 billion.  The image above shows a Microsoft research facility in Beijing

The announcement was made Thursday by Microsoft, LinkedIn’s parent company, which acquired the service in 2016 for $26.2 billion. The image above shows a Microsoft research facility in Beijing

In 2014, LinkedIn agreed to China’s requirement to offer a filtered version of the service, making it one of the few US tech companies operating in the country.

In 2019, LinkedIn reported about 44 million users in China, making it the world’s third largest customer base of the networking platform. LinkedIn has about 111 million users in the US and 29 million in India.

In March, Chinese government regulators punished LinkedIn after it accused the service of not censoring content it found offensive. New signups to the site were suspended for a month and LinkedIn had to file a self-assessment with authorities.

“While we’ve found success in helping Chinese members find jobs and economic opportunities, we haven’t found that same success in the more social aspects of sharing and staying informed,” Microsoft, the computer giant that bought LinkedIn in 2016 for $26.2. billion, said in a statement.

“We are also facing a significantly more challenging work environment and stricter compliance requirements in China.”

LinkedIn is moving to a site called InJobs, a job search site for professionals from China that will not include a social feed or the ability to share posts or articles.

Last month, several China-based US journalists and academics reported that their LinkedIn accounts had been blocked

J Michael Cole, a China-based consultant, posted a tweet with a screenshot of a message he received from LinkedIn.

Thank you @LinkedIn for informing that due to the presence of prohibited content in the publishing area of ​​your LinkedIn profile, your profile and your public activities, such as your comments and items you share with your network, will not be made visible in China. ‘

Jojje Olsson, a Swedish writer based in Asia, posted a similar message on Twitter.

“This is absolutely incredible – under ‘Education’ on my LinkedIn profile, I mention in one line that my degree is easily written in modern Chinese history about the Tiananmen Square massacre,” Olsson tweeted.

Last month, several China-based American journalists and academics reported that their LinkedIn accounts had been blocked.  J Michael Cole, a China-based consultant, posted a tweet with a screenshot of a message he received from LinkedIn

Last month, several China-based American journalists and academics reported that their LinkedIn accounts had been blocked. J Michael Cole, a China-based consultant, posted a tweet with a screenshot of a message he received from LinkedIn

Melissa Chan, a reporter for several US-based outlets, tweeted:

Melissa Chan, a reporter for several US-based outlets, tweeted: “I got the @LinkedIn warning like many others – my ‘banned content’ will not be shown in China. I have a case number’

Jojje Olsson, a Swedish writer based in Asia, posted a similar message on Twitter

Jojje Olsson, a Swedish writer based in Asia, posted a similar message on Twitter

Mark Anning, a Paris-based photographer, tweeted:

Mark Anning, a Paris-based photographer, tweeted, “LinkedIn just banned my profile in China…” due to the presence of banned content in the Experience section of your LinkedIn profile, your profile, and your public activities, such as your comments and items you share with your network will not be made visible in China”.’

Greg C. Bruno, an author who has written books on China, was also notified that his profile would not be visible in the country

Greg C. Bruno, an author who has written books on China, was also notified that his profile would not be visible in the country

B. Allen-Ebrahimian, a China-based Axios reporter, tweeted: 'I woke up this morning to find LinkedIn had blocked my profile in China'

B. Allen-Ebrahimian, a China-based Axios reporter, tweeted: ‘I woke up this morning to find LinkedIn had blocked my profile in China’

“LinkedIn’s response is to censor my entire profile for Chinese users.”

B. Allen-Ebrahimian, an Axios reporter based in China, tweeted, “I woke up this morning to find LinkedIn had blocked my profile in China.

“I used to have to wait for censors from the Chinese government, or censors employed by Chinese companies in China, to do things like this.

“Now an American company pays its own employees to censor Americans.”

Mark Anning, a Paris-based photographer, tweeted, “LinkedIn just banned my profile in China…” due to the presence of banned content in the Experience section of your LinkedIn profile, your profile, and your public activities, such as your comments and items you share with your network will not be made visible in China”.’

Greg C. Bruno, an author who has written books about China, was also notified that his profile would not be visible in the country.

“It took #Chinese censors three years, but my book, #BlessingsFromBeijing, has just been labeled as ‘banned content’ by @LinkedIn in China,” Bruno tweeted.

Melissa Chan, a reporter for several US-based outlets, tweeted: “I got the @LinkedIn warning like many others – my ‘banned content’ will not be shown in China. I have a case number.

“Could be anything – from this year’s piece on Uyghurs in exile to my essay on democracy.”

In response to the bans, LinkedIn said: axios“We are a global platform that respects the laws that apply to us, including complying with Chinese government regulations for our localized version of LinkedIn in China.

“For members whose profile visibility is limited in China, their profiles will still be visible in the rest of the world where LinkedIn is available.”

LinkedIn’s ties to the Chinese government were criticized by US lawmakers who wanted to know if the site had turned over Americans’ user data to authorities in Beijing.

Chinese digital services operating in the United States have also attracted the attention of US regulators over fears that they pose a security risk.  The TikTok logo can be seen above

Chinese digital services operating in the United States have also attracted the attention of US regulators over fears that they pose a security risk. The TikTok logo can be seen above

Last year, Zoom said it would suspend operations in mainland China after government regulators pressured the video conferencing app to ban gatherings commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre.

Chinese digital services operating in the United States have also attracted the attention of US regulators over fears that they pose a security risk.

Earlier this year, the Biden administration dropped Trump-era executive orders intended to ban popular apps TikTok and WeChat and will conduct its own assessment to identify national security risks with software applications associated with China.

A new executive order instructs the Ministry of Commerce to conduct an “evidence-based” analysis of transactions involving apps manufactured or supplied or controlled by China.

Officials are particularly concerned about apps that collect users’ personal data or have connections to Chinese military or intelligence activities.

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