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Law student scolded for appearing too ‘subway’ by an angry group of Byron Bay residents in a passing car

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Student reveals VERY bizarre slur he got from angry Byron Bay residents who told him to ‘go back to Sydney’ because they ‘didn’t like his shirt’

  • Dakota Wyatt, 25, was assaulted while waiting for food in Byron Bay after work
  • The group of men in a passing vehicle scoffed at him based on his clothing
  • The student recently returned to the NSW region after moving to Victoria in 2016
  • Mr Wyatt said the level of acceptance of Byron Bay locals to outsiders has shifted










A law student is shocked after residents of Byron Bay called him a “metrof**k” when they beat him with a volley of abuse for not liking his clothes.

Dakota Wyatt, 25, of New Brighton on the north coast of NSW, had gone to dinner at about 10 p.m. Sunday after completing a shift at his job in Byron Bay.

Mr. Wyatt was wearing a distinctive colored button-up shirt and white jeans, matching the Sunday theme of his workplace, when he was assaulted by a group of angry men in a passing vehicle.

Dakota Wyatt (pictured), 25, was wearing a brightly colored button-up shirt and white jeans when he was assaulted by a group of men in a car

“A car slowed almost to the curb on the main street in Byron Bay and they yelled, ‘Get back to Sydney, you tube f**k,'” he told the Daily Mail Australia.

“Metro” is short for “metrosexual,” a term used to describe city men who are particularly picky about their grooming, fashion, and overall appearance.

The 25-year-old student clearly said he wasn’t fond of his clothes.

Mr. Wyatt hadn’t known that the term “metrosexual” was ever used as a defamation.

The student said he knew the slur was no joke because the men were aggressive towards him (stock image of Byron Bay)

The student said he knew the slur was no joke because the men were aggressive towards him (stock image of Byron Bay)

The student, who recently returned to the area after moving to Victoria for several years in 2016, said he fears others will not know how to handle it if they find themselves in the same situation.

“I’ve worked in the legal system and counseled clients with mental health issues, so I know how to handle situations,” said Mr. Wyatt.

The student, who recently returned to the area after moving to Victoria for several years in 2016, said he fears others may not know how to handle the same situation when faced with them.

The student, who recently returned to the area after moving to Victoria for several years in 2016, said he fears others may not know how to handle the same situation when faced with them.

The 25-year-old said there had been a huge shift in the level of outsider acceptance by locals since he last lived in the region (Pictured: people walking by and sitting in a coffee shop in Byron Bay)

The 25-year-old said there had been a huge shift in the level of outsider acceptance by locals since he last lived in the region (Pictured: people walking by and sitting in a coffee shop in Byron Bay)

“However, my biggest concern is if this happens to another person who doesn’t know what to do in these situations, as we’re already seeing the suicide and self-harm statistics on the rise.”

The 25-year-old, who grew up in the Northern Rivers region of NSW, said there had been a huge shift in the level of outsider acceptance by locals since he last lived in the area.

“The hostility in the area has certainly increased, whether it’s because of the Covid-19 pandemic and the rise in social anxiety.”

Mr. Wyatt also believed that the current housing crisis has played a part in increasing hostility among the local population.

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