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Insulate Britain activist Emma Smart moved from HMP Bronzefield to hospital wing amid hunger strike

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Prisoner Insulate Britain activist is moved from prison cell to hospital ward after 13 days of hunger strike, as staff ‘increasingly concerned about her health’

  • Emma Smart, 44, was jailed for taking part in Insulate Britain’s M25 blocking protests
  • Smart has been on hunger strike since moving to HMP Bronzefield 13 days ago
  • Isolate Britain says she was transferred to hospital wing due to health problems










An imprisoned Insulate Britain activist who was on hunger strike while incarcerated has been moved from her cell to a hospital wing, members say.

The eco-activists say prison staff at HMP Bronzefield, Surrey, have become “increasingly concerned” about Emma Smart’s health.

The 44-year-old has been on hunger strike for 13 days since serving four months in prison for her part in Insulate Britain’s roadblock protests.

Today, the group said in a post on Twitter: “Emma, ​​who is on hunger strike in jail for 13 days today, was moved from her cell to the hospital wing of HMP Bronzefield on Friday.

“The prison is increasingly concerned about her health.”

Imprisoned Insulate Britain activist Emma Smart (pictured), who is on hunger strike while incarcerated, has been taken to hospital, the group says.

Smart, 44, has been on hunger strike for 13 days since being jailed for her role in Insulate Britain's disruptive roadblock protests

Smart, 44, has been on hunger strike for 13 days since being jailed for her role in Insulate Britain’s disruptive roadblock protests

Smart was imprisoned with eight other people from Insulate Britain (Photo: An Insulate Britain protest) who received sentences of three to six months and each was ordered to pay costs of £5,000

Smart was imprisoned with eight other people from Insulate Britain (Photo: An Insulate Britain protest) who received sentences of three to six months and each was ordered to pay costs of £5,000

It comes as the group released a statement today on behalf of the imprisoned eco-activist.

From the prison she said: ‘The window of my cell in the hospital wing is blocked and there is little natural light, in my previous cell I could see the birds and trees that line the prison fence.

“I now have less time to go out in prison to exercise.

“All of this is testing my determination to keep going, but I feel like not eating is the only thing I can do from prison to draw attention to those who this winter will have to choose between heating and food.

“Not watching our government commit treason against the people of this country feels like the most important thing I will do in my life.”

Smart was jailed along with eight other Insulate Britain activists, who were given sentences of three to six months after violating a ban designed to stop the group’s roadblock protests.

They were also ordered to pay the costs of £5,000 each. The court ordered that the imprisoned activists serve at least half of their sentences.

Another group of nine people from Insulate Britain have been subpoenaed to appear before the Supreme Court next month on charges of contempt of court.

If found guilty, they could be subject to unlimited fines, seizure of assets and jail terms of up to two years.

Smart, who was imprisoned earlier this month, was sent to HMP Bronzefield in Ashford, Surrey.

It was Britain’s first purpose-built prison for women when it opened in 2004.

The eco-activists say prison staff at HMP Bronzefield (pictured), Surrey, have become 'increasingly concerned' about the health of one of its members, Emma Smart

The eco-activists say prison staff at HMP Bronzefield (pictured), Surrey, have become ‘increasingly concerned’ about the health of one of its members, Emma Smart

Smart, who was imprisoned earlier this month, was sent to HMP Bronzefield in Ashford, Surrey, the first purpose-built prison for women in Britain when it opened in 2004.

Smart, who was imprisoned earlier this month, was sent to HMP Bronzefield in Ashford, Surrey, the first purpose-built prison for women in Britain when it opened in 2004.

Up to 572 female inmates can be held in the Category A prison, spread over four house blocks that can each hold about 130 people.

Each wing has a server room where women can collect their food, eat it together on the wing, or take it back to their rooms.

There is also a telephone in each room. It has a care facility with 17 beds and a mother and baby unit for 12 women and 13 babies up to 18 months.

Bronzefield is a private prison, operated by the firm Sodexo, which has been approached for comment.

The Justice Department told MailOnline to contact Sodexo for comment.

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