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Golden retrievers Gus and Dora like to fly in their owner’s plane

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These two Golden Retrievers love to fly in small airplane cockpits with their owner.

Since Justin Coleman’s two dogs, Gus and Dora, were 12 weeks old, they have accompanied their owner in his RV-9A plane on scenic flights around Denver, Colorado.

Adorable footage shows two-year-old Gus sitting proudly next to 42-year-old Justin, watching intently from the cockpit as they take off and looking down at the ground below.

Gus can’t hide his pleasure and even tries to claw at passing planes, thinking they are birds, while sticking out his tongue.

The engineer says he even modified the plane for the dogs — removing the passenger-side stick so they can’t bump into it as they move around in their seats.

Dora the six month old Golden Retriever enjoys her time in the air

Since Justin Coleman's two dogs Gus and Dora were 12 weeks old, they have accompanied their owner in his RV-9A plane on scenic flights around Denver, Colorado.

Since Justin Coleman’s two dogs Gus and Dora were 12 weeks old, they have accompanied their owner in his RV-9A plane on scenic flights around Denver, Colorado.

Mr. Coleman does not have specific equipment for his two dogs, but has moved the passenger stick handle to make extra room for Gus (pictured) who weighs over five pounds

Mr. Coleman does not have specific equipment for his two dogs, but has moved the passenger stick handle to make extra room for Gus (pictured) who weighs over five pounds

Since Justin Coleman's two dogs Gus and Dora were 12 weeks old, they have accompanied their owner in his RV-9A plane on scenic flights around Denver, Colorado.

Since Justin Coleman’s two dogs Gus and Dora were 12 weeks old, they have accompanied their owner in his RV-9A plane on scenic flights around Denver, Colorado.

Mr Coleman said: ‘Gus enjoys flying very much and is very comfortable. I imagine he thinks it’s similar to driving a car.

“While the plane is taxiing, the canopy of the plane can be open so that he sticks his head out, looking and smelling for squirrels and birds.

“Even when it’s closed and we’re thousands of feet in the air, he does the same.

“Gus has shown an affinity for steep turns and short-lived negative Gs, so we do that occasionally.

“He’s been with me on a few formation flights and is intently focused on the plane I’m flying next to, scratching the window thinking it’s a bird.

“When I ask Gus ‘Do I want to go to the airport’ he runs out of the house and waits for me by the garage door.

“Dora is still too new for me to gauge her interest, except she seems eager to go along.

Winging it: Gus the Golden Retriever likes to fly with his owner Justin Coleman

Winging it: Gus the Golden Retriever likes to fly with his owner Justin Coleman

Mr. Coleman has no specific equipment for his two dogs, but has moved the passenger stick handle to make extra room for Gus, who weighs more than five bricks.

Mr. Coleman has no specific equipment for his two dogs, but has moved the passenger stick handle to make extra room for Gus, who weighs more than five bricks.

In the photo: Gus as a puppy.  Mr Coleman says he even modified the plane for the dogs - removing the passenger side stick so they can't bump into it as they move around in their seats

In the photo: Gus as a puppy. Mr Coleman says he even modified the plane for the dogs – removing the passenger side stick so they can’t bump into it as they move around in their seats

“There are really no limits to what I can do with it, but I keep the flight profile pretty comfortable because I want them to enjoy it.

“Takeoff and landing are critical phases of flight where my mind has to be 100% focused so I was hyper aware of their behavior and all the moves they were making so it didn’t affect what I was doing and I was prepared to break off when I sensed something wasn’t right.

“It turned out I had nothing to worry about and they were more relaxed than most human passengers.”

Mr. Coleman has no specific equipment for his two dogs, but has moved the passenger stick controls to make extra room for Gus, who weighs more than five pounds.

Mr Coleman said: ‘I don’t have any special equipment or arrangements for the dogs as they just sit in the seat next to me.

“Since Gus has just grown so tall, I removed the joystick controls from the passenger side of the plane to give him more room to sit in the seat.

“Removing them also eliminates the risk of them accidentally bumping into it if the flight is bumpy or if they adjust in the seat during the flight.

“I think everyone is a little intrigued, some get excited, point, wave and smile when they see the dogs on the plane.

“I’m just a general aviation pilot and have a real passion for flying. Having a dog as a copilot makes it more fun.

“By the time they both flew with me, they had a lot of experience driving my wife or I in a car, so we knew they weren’t prone to motion sickness.

‘On their first flights they both behaved the same way, very eager to learn, lots to see and smell.

“They couldn’t see well over the side of the cockpit unless they were leaning on their legs, so after about 15 minutes they crawled on the seat and went to sleep.

“When I first started flying with Gus, I was a little concerned about how it would turn out, so I started introducing them little by little.

“My wife, Kristen, and I don’t have kids, just the two dogs and expensive hobbies, so we try to include them in just about everything we can.”

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