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Furious biker blows up new ‘mandatory makeup rules’, comparing WA to Nazi Germany

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A member of an outlaw bikie gang has flouted a new Western Australian law that could result in him and his fellow tattooed associates being forced to wear makeup.

Chris ‘Ballistic’ Orchard, whose motto is the implied threat that ‘I shake hands to negotiate…I throw hands to renegotiate’ compared to a harsh new law a ban on the public display of “Nazi Germany” gang insignia.

“Like we (are) now in North Korea (or) Nazi Germany, whatever you want to call it, we’ve lost freedoms there anyone who thinks this is right, you’re delusional,” Coffin Cheaters gang member Orchard wrote on facebook.

Chris ‘Ballistic’ Orchard (pictured left) is all smiles in this photo, but not too happy about a new Western Australian law that could force him to cover his bicycle tattoos with makeup

The new bill, touted as Australia’s “toughest,” targets 46 clubs, including the Coffin Cheaters, Hells Angels, Rebels, Bandidos and Gypsy Jokers, and bans all wording associated with it from public view.

Acting WA Police Commissioner Col Blanch said people like the heavily tattooed Hells Angel Dayne Brajkovich may need to start wearing makeup or “bandages.”

Among Brajkovich’s many tattoos are the word “Hells Angels” on his forehead and “1%er” on his neck.

Dayne Brajkovich leaves the court.  A new law in Western Australia could force him to wear makeup to cover up his tattoos

Dayne Brajkovich leaves the court. A new law in Western Australia could force him to wear makeup to cover up his tattoos

The ‘1%er’ tattoo is accepted as the property of an outlaw biker gang and it is widely believed that the wearer has committed acts of violence for their club.

The law would make it illegal to “display prohibited insignia,” including wearing gang insignia and even going out in public with visible gang tattoos.

It comes before the Western Australian Parliament this week and is likely to be passed.

Facial tattoos, clothing or even stickers or painted badges on a motorcycle or car are included in the bill.

“I would definitely start with bandages or makeup or have it removed or alternatively people could choose not to live in Western Australia if this law is passed,” Blanch told 6PR’s morning program, referring to Brajkovich.

Hells Angels sergeant-at-arms Dayne Brajkovich is known for his signature tattoos that cover much of his body.  He is pictured in a previous court appearance

Hells Angels sergeant-at-arms Dayne Brajkovich is known for his signature tattoos that cover much of his body. He is pictured in a previous court appearance

The Coffin Cheaters were founded in Perth, Western Australia in 1970. They are said to have been the first Australian gang to expand internationally, with affiliates in Norway following “patched up” mergers in 2004 and 2005.

Coffin Cheater Orchard has also called for a brutal response to another group of lawbreakers.

“How about instead of having us remove or cover up our tattoos, you can force child molesters to get tattoos to identify them and force them to show them in public at all times?” he said.

A commentator named Mick Cannon agreed with Orchard and kicked out politicians. ‘That means all politicians who also like to mess around with children. You should all have it tattooed on your fucking foreheads,” he said.

Another supporter, Jason Nankivell, wrote that he “didn’t agree more. Yet churches (can) accommodate pedophiles and Islamic terrorists without any problems.’

Chris 'Ballistic' Orchard (pictured right) is very concerned that a new law in Western Australia will force him to hide his prized tattoos

Chris ‘Ballistic’ Orchard (pictured right) is very concerned that a new law in Western Australia will force him to hide his prized tattoos

Orchard’s comparison of Western Australia’s proposed crackdown on outlaw bikie gangs with life in “Nazi Germany” also found support on his Facebook page.

Sam Howat is concerned that the law could cause people to overheat on hot summer days. “So on a day of 43 degrees you have to wear a sweater because you have a name tattooed on your arm. That’s fu**ed!,” he wrote.

Another called for bodily autonomy within the motorcycle gang community to be respected by the state government of Western Australia.

“Fucken bullshit what people have on their (sic) bodies there is (sic) choice where (sic) not north korea ffs,” wrote Jason Ritchie.

In April, WA Hells Angels Police Commissioner Chris Dawson criticized Sergeant-at-arms Brajkovich’s clothing at a Perth Magistrates Court, condemning the hearing as “unacceptable.”

He wore a jersey with the Hells Angels Motorcycle Club initials HAMC and “HOF CITY” on it, presumably a nod to a chapter the gang has in the German town of Hof.

His jersey also bore the numbers 81 on the jersey, a not-so-subtle nod to Hells Angels, with H the eighth letter of the alphabet and A the first.

The new bill, touted as Australia's 'toughest', targets 46 clubs, including the Hells Angels, Rebels, Bandidos, Gypsy Jokers and Coffin Cheaters by banning all words related to it from public use.

The new bill, touted as Australia’s ‘toughest’, targets 46 clubs, including the Hells Angels, Rebels, Bandidos, Gypsy Jokers and Coffin Cheaters by banning all words related to it from public use.

Brajkovich punched Rebels bike kingpin Nick Martin during a brawl in a bar on November 24, 2020, two weeks before Martin was shot dead at the Perth Motorplex in Kwinana Beach.

Dawson said Brajkovich’s tattoos and clothing are “completely disrespectful, not only to the court, but to the community.”

“This is not that we are hypersensitive to what people wear, this is absolute resistance by saying ‘I am outside the law and I am outside the law’.”

The maximum penalties for wearing prohibited badges under the new law are 12 months in prison, a $12,000 fine for individuals or up to $60,000 for “corporations.”

Mr Blanch said the law was anti-bikie gangs, not anti-tattoos.

“Young men are attracted to motorcycle clubs because they are an outlaw motorcycle gang to show the insignia as power, the representation of numbers.”

Brajkovich's outlandish fashion statement leaving court came under fire from Western Australian Police Commissioner Chris Dawson (pictured)

Brajkovich’s outlandish fashion statement leaving court came under fire from Western Australian Police Commissioner Chris Dawson (pictured)

Under the new law, gang members can also face a $12,000 fine and 12 months in prison for “associating” after being given a notice to disperse.

Gang members can be ordered to stay apart for three years, and after two or more offenses, the gang members can face up to five years in prison.

WA Police Secretary Paul Papalia said the new law is part of a plan to “methodically dismantle bicycle gangs in this state.”

“We are committed to making WA a safe place without the fear of cyclists chasing their own vendettas at the expense of law-abiding citizens.”

Brajkovic was charged with a brawl in November - two weeks before Martin's death - in which the pair fought in a crowded bar in Perth's beachside suburb of Scarborough.

Brajkovic was charged with a brawl in November – two weeks before Martin’s death – in which the pair fought in a crowded bar in Perth’s beachside suburb of Scarborough.

WA Attorney General John Quigley Said Law Deliberately Calls ’46’ organizations including outlaw biker gangs from across Australia, their affiliated gangs or ‘feeder clubs’ and street gangs.

“These organizations and their patches are designed to show ties to crime and intimidate others, including law-abiding citizens in our community. That will stop as soon as these laws are in place.’

“These laws represent the toughest and most comprehensive reforms to fight organized crime in any of the Australian states and territories.”

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