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Florida’s new surgeon general refused to mask for meeting with state senator who has cancer

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Florida’s new surgeon general has been accused of refusing to wear a mask to a meeting with a state senator battling breast cancer — then telling her it was fun to do so.

Florida senator Tina Polsky was diagnosed with breast cancer in August and will soon begin radiation therapy.

She said she had asked Joseph Ladapo “several times” to put on a face mask during a one-on-one meeting in her office earlier this week, only for him to reportedly decline.

“I told him I had a serious medical condition,” Polsky said, according to FloridaPolitics.com.

Joseph Ladapo (pictured), who has previously downplayed COVID vaccines and advocates for

Florida senator Tina Polsky (left) was diagnosed with breast cancer in August and will soon begin radiation therapy. She said she had asked Joseph Ladapo (right) earlier this week to put on a face mask “several times” during a one-on-one meeting in her office.

'I really wanted to interview him.  I had a lot of good questions,

‘I really wanted to interview him. I had a lot of good questions,” state senator Tina Polsky said in the photo. said. “So that was a shame I didn’t do it. But I felt really uncomfortable’

In a Sept. 16 op-ed in The Wall Street Journal, the Joseph Ladapo (pictured) condemned

In a Sept. 16 op-ed in The Wall Street Journal, the Joseph Ladapo (pictured) condemned “a zealous pursuit of wearing public masks,” which he wrote “has had a modest effect at best on viral transmissions.”

She told the outlet that Ladapo had offered to hold the meeting outside the locked room, to which she replied, “I don’t want to go out — I want you to sit in my office and talk to you.”

When Polsky asked the surgeon general why he didn’t want to wear a mask, she said he ‘smiles'[d] and did not answer’.

“He’s very smug,” she said. “I’ve told him several times, ‘I have this very serious medical condition,’ and he said ‘that’s okay’ as if it actually had nothing to do with what we were talking about.”

At that point, Polsky said she’d asked him to leave her office, but Ladapo made sure he got the last word:

“Sometimes I try to reason with unreasonable people for fun,” Ladapo said as he left the room, Polsky said.

‘I really wanted to interview him. I had a lot of good questions,” Polsky said. “So that was a shame I didn’t do it. But I felt really uncomfortable.’

Polsky retweeted a post on Twitter, which she said was an “excellent question,” suggesting Ladapo might have reacted differently had she been a “Republican male senator.”

Polsky retweeted a post on Twitter, which she said was an

Polsky retweeted a post on Twitter, which she said was an “excellent question,” suggesting Ladapo might have reacted differently had she been a “Republican male senator.”

Ladapo also promoted malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for the coronavirus.  Former President Donald Trump said he was taking the drug, which was briefly approved by the FDA before the decision was quickly reversed when he contracted the virus last year

Ladapo also promoted malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for the coronavirus. Former President Donald Trump said he was taking the drug, which was briefly approved by the FDA before the decision was quickly reversed when he contracted the virus last year

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people with cancer who undergo heavy cancer treatments are at a higher risk of developing severe symptoms if they contract COVID-19.

A spokesperson for the Ministry of Health refuted Polsky’s story.

‘Dr. Ladapo is committed to meeting with members of the legislature, regardless of party affiliation, to discuss policy even if they disagree on the subject in question,” spokesman Weesam Khoury told FloridaPolitics.com.

“Meetings between highly regarded and intelligent elected and appointed officials happen all the time, and it’s disappointing you don’t hear about them more – but it’s probably because the only time they’re reported is when an actual meeting turns into a media headline expected from a gossip column.’

Ladapo, who has previously downplayed COVID vaccines and advocates for “the right to choose how best to protect themselves and their families,” earned an MD from Harvard Medical School and a doctorate in health policy from the Graduate School of Arts. and Sciences from Harvard.

He was appointed to the role of surgeon general by Florida Governor Ron DeSantis, who shares Ladapo’s aversion to vaccine mandates.

The surgeon general was appointed to the role of surgeon general by Florida Governor Ron DeSantis (pictured), who shares Ladapo's aversion to vaccine mandates.

The surgeon general was appointed to the role of surgeon general by Florida Governor Ron DeSantis (pictured), who shares Ladapo’s aversion to vaccine mandates.

“Vaccinations are up to the person. There is nothing special about them compared to other preventive measures,” Ladapo told reporters in September.

In a Sept. 16 op-ed in The Wall Street Journal, the doctor condemned “a zealous commitment to wearing public masks,” which he wrote “has had a modest effect at best on viral transmissions.”

Ladapo also promoted malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for the coronavirus. Former President Donald Trump said he was taking the drug, which was briefly approved by the FDA before the decision was quickly reversed when he contracted the virus last year

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