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Engelbert Humperdinck, 85, says his wife’s death from Covid ‘has hit him pretty hard’

Engelbert Humperdinck, 85, says his 56-year-old wife’s death from Covid ‘has hit him pretty hard’ – but insists ‘it’s his job’ to tour and sing ‘sensitive lyrics’

  • Engelbert Humperdinck says his wife’s death ‘has hit him pretty hard’
  • The 85-year-old singer from Leicester announced the death of his wife in February
  • He appeared on Good Morning Britain today to promote his new tour

Engelbert Humperdinck has revealed how his wife’s death from the coronavirus ‘has affected him quite a bit’.

The 85-year-old singer, who lives in Leicester, announced the death of his 56-year-old wife Patricia in February this year, explaining that she was “sliding gently” after a “brave” 13-year battle with Alzheimer’s disease. .

When appearing on Good Morning Britain to promote his new tour The Legend Continues, Engelbert admitted it was “pretty hard” to move on without his wife.

However, he added that his fans have been “absolutely fantastic” and that he is looking forward to singing for them again, despite the “sensitive lyrics” as “it’s his job”.

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Engelbert Humperdinck (pictured) has revealed how his wife's death from coronavirus has 'affected him quite badly'

Engelbert Humperdinck (pictured) has revealed how his wife’s death from coronavirus has ‘affected him quite badly’

The 85-year-old singer, who lives in Leicester, announced the death of his 56-year-old wife Patricia (pictured together) in February this year, explaining that she “slid gently” after a “brave” 13-year-old. battle with Alzheimer’s disease

Speaking to hosts Kate Garraway and Richard Madeley, he began: ‘I don’t keep it bad. The whole family has been in the dark lately because we finally got her home (from Los Angeles).

“Since February we’ve been waiting, waiting for the quarantine to go away so we can give her a good last goodbye at our home in Leicester. She’s finally home and we’re grateful for that.’

Patricia eventually got Covid-19 and also suffered from Alzheimer’s for the last decade of her life.

Engelbert continued to talk about her passing, adding: “I don’t know how it will affect me, I don’t know yet. It’s influenced me quite a bit so far and I know I’m going to tour and sing sensitive songs and things like that, but that’s my job and I know my wife would want me to do that.

“So I’m going to go ahead and visit her garden, which she always loved so much. She created the whole thing… I’ve been there doing bits and pieces and hopefully make her happy when she looks at me.”

When he appeared on Good Morning Britain (pictured) to promote his new tour The Legend Continues, Engelbert admitted it was “pretty hard” to move on without his wife

However, he added that his fans have been “absolutely fantastic” and that he is looking forward to singing for them again, despite the “sensitive lyrics” as “it’s his job”. Pictured, the singer with his wife

About the grief he has suffered this year: ‘I’m learning… It’s quite difficult. And being an artist and being on stage and singing sensitive lyrics – and each lyric can touch your heart in different ways – but it doesn’t matter, it’s my job.

“I’m a singing teacher and I have to go out and do my best. My fans were absolutely fantastic. They have all been so supportive of me during this period of my life and I love them all.”

The singer, who contracted Covid in January, also commented on earning an MBE in this year’s Queen’s Birthday Honours.

He said: ‘I’m excited about what’s happened in my life with the MBE, which was pretty awesome because Her Majesty the Queen gave me the chance to put letters after my name so it now sets me apart from the original Engelbert Humperdinck. , which is quite nice.’

Soulmates: The couple's love story spans over 70 years (pictured in their Leicester home in 1999)

Soulmates: The couple's love story spans over 70 years (pictured in their Leicester home in 1999)

Soulmates: The couple’s love story spans over 70 years (pictured in their Leicester home in 1999)

Throwback: Engelbert has often talked about Patricia's Alzheimer's since she was diagnosed over a decade ago (pictured in 1991)

Throwback: Engelbert has often talked about Patricia's Alzheimer's since she was diagnosed over a decade ago (pictured in 1991)

Throwback: Engelbert has often talked about Patricia’s Alzheimer’s since she was diagnosed over a decade ago (pictured in 1991)

Co-host Richard concluded the interview by asking the 85-year-old about his morning routine, to which Engelbert replied: ‘I exercise, I haven’t been in the mood lately, but I do keep my body in shape. and that keeps your mind healthy.’

Engelbert topped the UK Singles Chart in the 1960s with his hits Release Me and The Last Waltz.

He also represented the United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest in 2012 with the song Love Will Set You Free, finishing second to last.

Engelbert Humperdinck Takes The Legend Continues… UK Tour In Autumn 2021

Good Morning Britain on weekdays from 6am on ITV and ITV Hub

WHAT IS ALZHEIMER?

Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive, degenerative disease of the brain in which the build-up of abnormal proteins causes nerve cells to die.

This disrupts the transmitters that transmit messages and causes the brain to shrink.

More than 5 million people suffer from the disease in the US, where it is the 6th leading cause of death, and more than 1 million Britons have it.

WHAT IS HAPPENING?

When brain cells die, the functions they provide are lost.

That includes memory, orientation, and the ability to think and reason.

The course of the disease is slow and gradual.

On average, patients live five to seven years after diagnosis, but some may live ten to 15 years.

EARLY SYMPTOMS:

  • Loss of short-term memory
  • disorientation
  • Behavioral changes
  • mood swings
  • Difficulty handling or calling money

LATER SYMPTOMS:

  • Severe amnesia, forgetting close relatives, familiar objects or places
  • Becoming anxious and frustrated with the inability to understand the world, leading to aggressive behavior
  • Eventually loses the ability to walk
  • May have problems eating
  • The majority ultimately need 24-hour care

Source: Alzheimer’s Association

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