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Curve model who weighs 14th reveals how she was told to DOUBLE her morning-after pill dose

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A model has revealed how she left behind ‘the worst period of her life’ after her pharmacist advised her to take two morning after pills because she was ‘too big’.

Lucy Bennett, from London, who said she weighs around 14, was told by the doctor not to take just one pill, but instead to double her dose due to her size.

She posted on Instagram: ‘What happened was a kick in the gut for my mental health, thrush, vaginosis and the WORST period of my entire life. I had pains that I thought you only had with the birth of a child.’

Lucy went on to a sexual health clinic where a nurse told her she had gotten the double dose wrong, explaining, “She told me there was no evidence to support what the pharmacist had said and that his knowledge was outdated.”

Lucy Bennett, from London, revealed how she was left with ‘the worst period of her life’ after her pharmacist advised her to take two morning after pills because she was ‘too big’ (pictured)

Last week, the model, who is signed to Wilhelmina Models London and has posed for the likes of Dorothy Perkins and Body Shop, posted the following: “Soooo, I had sex (yay for me) and had the unpleasant experience of needing the morning had after pill. Hey, we all screw it up, don’t we?!’

Lucy, who told Refinery29 that she had previously had an abortion and used a fertility-tracking app as birth control, went to the doctor after a condom accident.”

She said she was taken to a side room by a male pharmacist, where she was asked all sorts of questions, including her weight, which she said was around 14..

He told her that women who weigh more than 70 kg should take a double dose of the morning after pill.

Lucy, was told by the doctor not to take just one pill but instead double her dose because of her size (pictured)

Lucy, was told by the doctor not to take just one pill but instead double her dose because of her size (pictured)

On Instagram, the model revealed how she felt 'concerned' after the pharmacist told her to double the dose of the morning after pill

On Instagram, the model revealed how she felt ‘concerned’ after the pharmacist told her to double the dose of the morning after pill

She said: ‘When I got to the pharmacy, I was told by the pharmacist that I was ‘too big’ for one pill and that I would have to take two every now and then.

Can a woman’s weight affect the efficacy of emergency contraception?

The link between weight and the effectiveness of the morning after pill has been put forward in previous studies, but has proved controversial.

Despite the reported link, previous guidelines in the UK have so far been unclear on this topic.

The problem first came to light in 2012, when a study from the University of Edinburgh found that obese women were more than three times more likely than normal-weight women to get pregnant after taking the morning-after pill.

The link was especially strong for levonorgestrel-based pills.

In 2013, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) forced the makers of Levonelle (Norlevo in the US) to add a warning on the packaging that the product may be less effective for overweight women.

But after a review in 2014, the agency made a U-turn, saying it’s suitable for heavier women.

In July 2016, a small study – with just 10 participants – found that the amount of the hormone present in the “overweight” women was 50 percent less than their lighter counterparts, meaning there was an increased risk of pregnancy.

Meanwhile, guidelines in 2017 warned that the morning-after pill could fail if taken by those who weigh 11 stones or more.

“I was quite apprehensive about this, especially as someone stopped using contraceptives due to the impact they all had on my mental and physical health over the years, but under the guidance of not wanting to get pregnant I took them both.”

A week later, Lucy called her doctor because her labia were ‘red, raw and bleeding’ and she was struggling with… an ‘incredibly heavy and painful period’.

After being left in terrible pain, Lucy decided to go for a checkup at the sexual health clinic.

She explained: “I was seen by a female nurse who told me almost immediately that I had been misprescribed.

“She said I’d only get one morning after pill if this ever happened again and no wonder I felt so shocked.”

Lucy continued: “To me, this is just the most recent tip of the iceberg when it comes to struggling with correctly diagnosing and treating female health conditions and I have definitely found myself feeling bitter about how it seems to women that sex never ends.” is ‘no’. strings tight”.

“Besides, I just wanted everyone of my body type to know about my experience and not feel pressured by the white coats calling you fat.”

In a follow-up video to TikTok, she said, “If our bodies react a certain way, why isn’t anyone reacting to it?”

“Just because it’s an accepted guideline, why don’t we ask ourselves why we have to suffer like this?”

Guidelines released in 2017 warned that the morning after pill could fail when taken by those who weigh 11 stones or more.

Those with a body mass index (BMI) over 26 are also at risk, according to new guidelines from sexual health experts.

Levonelle and ellaOne are the two most popular morning after pills available and both are believed to be less effective for overweight women.

Obviously, in taller women, the drug can be diluted or broken down more quickly by their bodies.

The new advice from the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH) calls on pharmacists and doctors to inform women about the risk of failure.

They have been told to recommend two morning-after pills – double dose – or insist on using the emergency coil instead.

FSRH is a faculty of the Royal College of the Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

The model revealed how she was later spotted by a female nurse who told her she got the morning after pill wrong

The model revealed how she was later spotted by a female nurse who told her she got the morning after pill wrong

At the time, FSRH vice president Dr Jane Dickson said: ‘The morning after pill works by delaying the release of eggs and interfering with fertilization by releasing a higher dose of the hormone progestin found in regular birth control pills. . .

“We believe there is some evidence that the drug may be less effective in overweight women because the drug is diluted in their bloodstream.

‘The 11 stone statue is based on research. It’s something of a random number and 15 stone may be the danger for some women. But for safety’s sake, 11 stone or a BMI over 26 is the level where we can say weight can be a risk.”

dr. Dickson explained that taller women who are concerned about pregnancy after contraceptive failure or unprotected sex can take the tablets two mornings after.

Lucy said she was determined to share her story because she wants 'everyone with her body type' to feel 'not pressured by the white coats'

Lucy said she was determined to share her story because she wants ‘everyone with her body type’ to feel ‘not pressured by the white coats’

BMI has become a measure of whether you are a healthy weight for your height.

FSRH recommends health professionals advise women that an intrauterine device (IUD or the coil) is the best emergency contraception.

dr. Dickson said: ‘The effectiveness of the coil is not affected by a woman’s weight as it works differently to prevent fertilization – it is toxic to sperm and eggs and acts locally.

“And weight issues aside, it’s more effective than the morning after pill.”

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