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BLM protester blaring loud music with the N word and monkey noises to black neighbor

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The Virginia man who has been in hiding since news that he was blaring loud music — complete with the N-word and monkey noises every time his black neighbor left her house — has finally been spotted after being house-bound for several days.

DailyMail.com grabbed exclusive first photos of John Eskilsden after he was purged from the safety of his home when three suspicious packages were delivered in his neighborhood.

Yet Eskilsden – who turns 48 next weekend – made no attempt to explain his seemingly racist behavior that has outraged his ethnically mixed neighborhood in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

Neither did his wife Marylou, 48. When DailyMail.com asked the jeweler if she had anything to say about the heartbreak her husband had caused, she curtly replied “No,” got in her car and drove off.

John Eskilsden, pictured, blared loud music – complete with the N-word and monkey sounds – every time his black neighbor left her house

A screenshot of the video Eskilsden's neighbor made in which he made monkey noises and made racist comments

A screenshot of the video Eskilsden’s neighbor made in which he made monkey noises and made racist comments

Navy veteran Jannique Martinez, pictured, appeared on Don Lemon's CNN show last week playing video of the blaring lights and obscene chants coming from her neighbor's house

Navy veteran Jannique Martinez, pictured, appeared on Don Lemon’s CNN show last week playing video of the blaring lights and obscene chants coming from her neighbor’s house

The Jessamine Court case has caused a stir nationwide since Eskilsden’s neighbor, Navy veteran Jannique Martinez, appeared on Don Lemon’s CNN show last week and played video of the blaring lights and obscene chants emanating from her neighbor’s house.

But Eskilsden refused to answer reporters’ questions — or even come to the door of his 4-bedroom house — because he was pilloried online.

Neighbors told DailyMail.com they hardly ever see him. “The only time he seems to come out is when he takes out the trash on a Wednesday night,” one of them said.

The rest of the time, he hides behind the walls of his house, which are covered by at least six security cameras and signs that read “Private Property, No Trespassing” and “Smile, You’re on Camera.”

Although he has now turned off the music and messaging following the publicity the case has gathered, exterior lights still flash every time a vehicle drives by or a pedestrian passes.

Black Lives Matter protesters gathered earlier this week posted their own messages in chalk on the road outside his home. One simply said “racist,” with an arrow pointing at the house. Another read “Not today, Satan.”

Pictured: BLM protesters, some armed, protest outside John Eskilsden's Virginia Beach home

Pictured: BLM protesters, some armed, protest outside John Eskilsden’s Virginia Beach home

One of the BLM protesters used chalk to write 'Not Today, Satan'

One of the BLM protesters used chalk to write ‘Not Today, Satan’

Another message written in chalk 'Racist', with an arrow pointing at the house

Another message written in chalk ‘Racist’, with an arrow pointing at the house

Black Lives Matter protesters gathered earlier this week posted their own messages in chalk on the road in front of his home

Black Lives Matter protesters gathered earlier this week posted their own messages in chalk on the road in front of his home

A second BLM protest took place Friday night.

Little is known about Eskilsden. He does not have an online profile. He has worked for PetSmart and was wearing a company shirt when he showed up at his door on Friday. He is also believed to have worked in technical support for Canon.

In the case of speeding tickets from years ago, his height was put at 5 ft 6 in and his weight at 260 lb.

He and his wife filed for bankruptcy in 2005 when they said they only had $10 in their checking account. At the time, he said he had a 5-year-old daughter and a 3-month-old son. That daughter, Cynthia, is now 22.

The Eskilsden family has been associated with the Jessamine Court home for nearly three decades. Public records show that it was originally purchased in 1995 by John’s father Walter Eskilsden, a Marine who later went on to work for the federal government. Walter Eskilsden passed away in 2016.

Jannique and Joel Martinez bought the house next door in 2017 for $299,000. They thought they had found the ideal place to live, Jannique told CNN last month.

‘I’m not going to lie, if I had any imagination, if it were, we wouldn’t have bought this house. I would never sign up for this,” she said.

“We noticed some erratic behavior, like those blinking lights on a sensor. When my family or any other family leaves or returns to their homes, they all start blinking.’

Eskilsden outside his home in Virginia Beach

Eskilsden outside his home in Virginia Beach

John Eskilsden's wife Marylou Eskildsen, pictured, seen leaving their home on Friday

John Eskilsden’s wife Marylou Eskildsen, pictured, seen leaving their home on Friday

“When the sensors are activated, loud music starts playing. He alternates the music with the family that activates the music.’

She had originally told her story to local TV station WAVY in Norfolk, Virginia.

“My son is terrified of him. Terrified, terrified,” she told the station. “The N-word situation… they came up to me and said, ‘Mom, what’s that?’ I have not subjected my children to that. I didn’t think they would ever have to learn what this means…’

Martinez, 41, told DailyMail.com that she had nothing to add to what she had told Lemon and WAVY.

She told Lemon that the monkey noises started when her husband parked his truck in the street in front of Eskilsden’s house.

“Since that day, he’s been playing N***** sketches he found online,” she said. Martinez said he plays skits that say, “Black people have nothing better to do than go to a comedy club on Friday nights,” and “Hello everyone, look, he’s a N***** guy. Everyone says, ‘Hi N ***** guy.’

Elementary school kids gather outside Eskilsden’s house every weekday morning to catch their bus. Parent Davina Stringer told DailyMail.com, “I’ve heard South Park play in a loop.”

“Then it was the monkey sounds and the N-word,” added the mother of children, ages 8 and 6.

“It’s completely inappropriate for kids to hear things like this when they’re waiting for their school bus.”

A 'Private Property No Trespassing' sign on the lawn of Eskildsen's property

A ‘Private Property No Trespassing’ sign on the lawn of Eskildsen’s property

Pictured: A sign that reads

Pictured: A sign that reads “Smile You’re on Camera” at the Marylou Eskildsen home of John Eskilsden and his wife

One of six visible surveillance cameras in the Marylou Eskildsen home of John Eskilsden and his wife

One of six visible surveillance cameras in the Marylou Eskildsen home of John Eskilsden and his wife

Neighbors expressed anger at Eskilsden, its loud music and security cameras. We are all under surveillance 24/7 with cameras in all directions from his home,” Martinez said.

Another neighbor who refused to give her name said, “My husband went to him and asked him to turn down his music. He wouldn’t even come to the door. He’s not just an asshole, he’s also a coward.’

Police have told Martinez and other neighbors there is nothing they can do about his messages.

The Virginia Beach Police Department tweeted a message that read: “As appalling and abusive as the neighbor’s behavior is, the Virginia city attorney and magistrates have separately determined that actions reported to date have not risen to a level that the law of Virginia as criminal behavior.” .’

“This means that VBPD had no authority to intervene and arrests were not supported.”

“We will monitor the situation closely, investigate complaints and, within the limits of the law, help this family with this very unfortunate situation.”

Pictured: Victim Jannique Martinez and Virginia Beach police officers in front of her Virginia Beach home

Pictured: Victim Jannique Martinez and Virginia Beach police officers in front of her Virginia Beach home

Virginia Beach Police Officers and Bomb-Sniffing Dogs Respond to Suspicious Packages Delivered to the Virginia Beach Neighborhood of John Eskilsden and Jannique Martinez

Virginia Beach Police Officers and Bomb-Sniffing Dogs Respond to Suspicious Packages Delivered to the Virginia Beach Neighborhood of John Eskilsden and Jannique Martinez

But maybe there will be action. Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring told the Washington Postthe situation is ‘unacceptable and will not be tolerated’.

He said his Civil Rights Bureau has been in contact with Martinez’s family and is working to end the alleged abuse.”

“Any form of racial harassment and discrimination in housing is illegal in the Commonwealth, and my team and I will take all steps to ensure it doesn’t happen in Virginia,” Herring said.

“No one should feel uncomfortable or in danger in their own home because of the actions of their neighbors.”

And on Friday afternoon, police showed up after USPS delivered suspicious packages to three of the four homes on Jessamine Court — including both Eskilsden’s and Martinez’s.

Two bomb-sniffing dogs were called in to assist as officers went door to door before eventually tearing open one of the packages and discovering it contained cotton wool and an empty black box from Boca Raton, Florida, company BOD Luxury Gifts.

Agents on the ground referred DailyMail.com to the department’s media relations department, which did not respond to requests for comment by email and telephone.

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