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Australian cars to be fitted with technology that ‘sniffs alcohol’ on the driver’s breath

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Australian cars could be fitted with sensors that ‘sniff’ booze and stop drink-driving FOREVER

  • Australian cars to be fitted with sensors that can ‘sniff’ alcohol levels
  • The sensors measure carbon dioxide and alcohol molecules in the driver’s breath
  • If the sensor detects alcohol levels above the legal limit, the car will not drive
  • Experts say the new groundbreaking technology will save thousands of lives










Australian cars will soon be equipped with sensors that can “sniff” alcohol, and experts say the revolutionary technology could save thousands of lives.

The technology behind the ‘ultimate breath test’ can detect a driver’s blood alcohol level in less than a second using the exhaled breath.

The sensors use infrared light rays to measure the amount of carbon dioxide and alcohol molecules in the air in the car.

If the sensors detect alcohol levels in excess of the legal amount, the car will not start, potentially stopping drunk driving for good.

The bright orange sensors (shown) can ‘sniff’ alcohol in a driver’s breath by measuring the amount of carbon dioxide and alcohol molecules in the air

Developers of the technology say the sensors are more powerful than current breath analyzers (pictured) and can distinguish between a driver and a passenger

Developers of the technology say the sensors are more powerful than current breath analyzers (pictured) and can distinguish between a driver and a passenger

Joe Calafiore, CEO of the Victorian Transport Accident Commission, said the technology was just as important as side curtain airbags or lane assist.

“You get in your car, you breathe, and it passively detects your breath,” Mr Calafiore told 9News.

“There are heavy hitters in the industry who say this is what the future will look like.”

Victoria will become the first jurisdiction outside the United States to test the new technology in trucks and cars in the coming months.

The groundbreaking technology has already sparked interest among some of Australia’s largest transport companies.

Joe Calafiore, CEO of the Victorian Transport Accident Commission (pictured) said the technology was just as important as side curtain airbags or lane assist

Joe Calafiore, CEO of the Victorian Transport Accident Commission (pictured) said the technology was just as important as side curtain airbags or lane assist

Companies will implement the technology in heavy-duty vehicles and fleets once it is approved for safe use.

Road Safety Minister Ben Carroll predicted that the sensors would become familiar features in Australian cars in just a few years.

“It’s also unobtrusive, it’s non-contact and it also has very important hygiene benefits,” he said.

According to developers, the sensors are more powerful than breath analyzers and can distinguish between a driver and a passenger.

Between January and September of this year, twenty-five Victorians died at the hands of drunk drivers, accounting for one-fifth of the state’s total death toll.

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